Translator Disclaimer
2 November 2006 Reflex-bleeding in the Firefly Pyrocoelia pectoralis (Coleoptera: Lampyridae): Morphological Basis and Possible Function
Xinhua Fu, Ohba Nobuyoshi, V. B. Meyer-Rochow, Yuyong Wang, Chaoliang Lei
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Male adults of the firefly Pyrocoelia pectoralis discharge fluids from along elytral and pronotal margins and around the antennal sockets, but females when tactually stimulated only discharge fluids from pronotal margins and antennal sockets. Both genders, when disturbed, may also occasionally discharge fluid from the anus. With regard to its content of haemocytes and proteins, the discharged fluid conforms to haemolymph. A series of circular, but irregularly spaced depressions in the insect's cuticle along the pronotal and elytral margins seems to be related to the ‘reflex-bleeding’ response. Each depression features a centrally-placed columnar structure, which is connected to its surroundings by a thin membrane that easily ruptures and, once broken, initiates reflex-bleeding. The whitish and viscous blood oozing out is very effective in repelling ants. Reflex-bleeding in the adults of Pyrocoelia pectoralis seems associated with thanatosis and luminescence and, thus, supports other defense reactions that the beetle has at its disposal.

Xinhua Fu, Ohba Nobuyoshi, V. B. Meyer-Rochow, Yuyong Wang, and Chaoliang Lei "Reflex-bleeding in the Firefly Pyrocoelia pectoralis (Coleoptera: Lampyridae): Morphological Basis and Possible Function," The Coleopterists Bulletin 60(3), 207-215, (2 November 2006). https://doi.org/10.1649/892.1
Received: 1 February 2006; Accepted: 1 May 2006; Published: 2 November 2006
JOURNAL ARTICLE
9 PAGES


Share
SHARE
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top