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1 December 2010 Fishing for Tigers: A Method for Collecting Tiger Beetle Larvae Holds Useful Applications for Biology and Conservation
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Abstract

A series of field studies examined the effectiveness of using a grass blade/stem to extract tiger beetle larvae (Coleoptera: Carabidae: Cicindelinae) from their burrows without damaging the larva or the burrow — a procedure often called fishing. We found that larvae of many species can be efficiently sampled at rates equal to or exceeding other methods. Extracted larvae have a low percentage of injury and can be assessed for parasitism and condition. They can be returned to either their own burrow or an alternative burrow where they can be re-sampled. The results of these studies indicate that fishing for tiger beetle larvae can be an effective tool for monitoring populations where larvae can be returned to existing burrows. In addition, the fishing technique allows for relocation of organisms while eliminating the impacts associated with excavating threatened species or larvae from rare habitats.

Mathew L. Brust, W. Wyatt Hoback, and Jennifer J. Johnson "Fishing for Tigers: A Method for Collecting Tiger Beetle Larvae Holds Useful Applications for Biology and Conservation," The Coleopterists Bulletin 64(4), (1 December 2010). https://doi.org/10.1649/0010-065X-64.4.313
Received: 19 May 2010; Accepted: 23 September 2010; Published: 1 December 2010
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