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1 August 2005 THE SPIDER FAUNA OF THE IRRIGATED RICE ECOSYSTEM IN CENTRAL KERALA, INDIA ACROSS DIFFERENT ELEVATIONAL RANGES
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Abstract

A survey of spiders associated with the irrigated rice ecosystem in central Kerala, India was conducted across different elevational ranges. Spiders were collected from rice fields of high ranges, midland and low land areas in two cropping seasons viz., June–September 2002 (Kanni Krishy) and October 2002–February 2003 (Makara Krishy) with a total of 144 hours of sampling time distributed across the two seasons. The sampling areas constituted Adimali and Marayoor of Idukki district (high range), Vannappuram of Idukki district and Kothamangalam of Ernakulam district (midland) and Parakkadavu and Piravom of Ernakulam district (lowland). Visual searching methods were used to sample the spider fauna from quadrats. A total of 1130 individuals belonging to 92 species, 47 genera and 16 families were recorded during the study period. Araneidae and Tetragnathidae were the dominant families and Tetragnatha mandibulata Walckenaer 1842 (Family Tetragnathidae) the most abundant species. Various diversity indices, as well as richness and Chao I estimator were used to analyze the possible effect of elevation on species occurrence; the results showed that species richness and diversity were the highest in Parakkadavu, which is a lowland area. In a cluster analysis the localities belonging to the same elevation were found to form separate groups. The species fell into seven feeding guilds. Orb weavers were dominant at all study sites.

P. A. Sebastian, M. J. Mathew, S. Pathummal Beevi, John Joseph, and C. R. Biju "THE SPIDER FAUNA OF THE IRRIGATED RICE ECOSYSTEM IN CENTRAL KERALA, INDIA ACROSS DIFFERENT ELEVATIONAL RANGES," The Journal of Arachnology 33(2), 247-255, (1 August 2005). https://doi.org/10.1636/05-08.1
Received: 12 January 2005; Published: 1 August 2005
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