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1 April 2013 Does behavioral isolation prevent interspecific mating within a parallel ecotypic wolf spider radiation from the Galápagos?
C. De Busschere, F. Hendrickx
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Abstract

Behavioral isolation may play an important role in speciation. However, the roles of divergence time and ecological specialization on the evolution of intrinsic barriers to gene flow are poorly understood. On the Galápagos, ecotypic differentiation of Hogna Simon 1885 wolf spiders has led to the repeated evolution of morphologically distinct high-elevation and coastal species on Santa Cruz and San Cristóbal. This offers a unique opportunity to investigate the importance of ecological factors and evolutionary history on courtship behavior, but also to explore the opportunity for interspecific gene flow. On San Cristóbal, both high elevation and coastal Hogna species clearly showed distinct courtship behavior. This pattern corresponded primarily with variation in male genital organs rather than with ecotypic classification or phylogenetic relationship. Despite low acceptance rates, heterospecific mating was observed, suggesting that potential gene flow within as well as among islands should not be neglected when seeking to understand island radiations.

The American Arachnological Society
C. De Busschere and F. Hendrickx "Does behavioral isolation prevent interspecific mating within a parallel ecotypic wolf spider radiation from the Galápagos?," The Journal of Arachnology 41(1), 25-30, (1 April 2013). https://doi.org/10.1636/K12-49
Received: 9 July 2012; Published: 1 April 2013
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