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1 April 2018 Evidence of airborne chemoreception in the scorpion Paruroctonus marksi (Scorpiones: Vaejovidae)
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Abstract

Chemically induced predator avoidance behaviors exist in many arthropods. In this paper, we examined the behavioral responses of the desert scorpion, Paruroctonus marksi (Haradon, 1984), to airborne chemical cues from a natural predator, the larger scorpion Hadrurus arizonensis (Ewing, 1928). We used a Y-shaped, dual-choice olfactometer to test for avoidance behavior in the presence of a known predator, H. arizonensis. Prior to this study there has been little research done on chemically induced predator avoidance behaviors in scorpions. The results of this study suggest that P. marksi is capable of detecting a predator's airborne cues, though the nature and identity of these cues remain unknown, and it appears that the constellation array of the fixed finger does function in detecting these cues. We also discuss the importance of adaptive predator avoidance behaviors.

Zia Nisani, Arielle Honaker, Victoria Jenne, Felina Loya, and Hoyoung Moon "Evidence of airborne chemoreception in the scorpion Paruroctonus marksi (Scorpiones: Vaejovidae)," The Journal of Arachnology 46(1), 40-44, (1 April 2018). https://doi.org/10.1636/JoA-16-092.1
Received: 12 December 2016; Published: 1 April 2018
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