Translator Disclaimer
1 March 2014 Communal Roosting in Heliconius Butterflies (Nymphalidae): Roost Recruitment, Establishment, Fidelity, and Resource Use Trends Based on Age and Sex
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Heliconius passion-vine butterflies form communal roosts on a nightly basis as an anti-predatory defense. Although past studies have evaluated various components of this behavior, much remains unknown about many basic aspects of roost dynamics. To learn more about communal roosting I examined roost establishment, recruitment, roost-mate resource use, roosting participation in a population, and roost arrival, departure, and perch preferences in natural populations of Heliconius erato petiverana in Panama. My observations suggest that 1) younger butterflies are recruited more readily than older butterflies, 2) roosts are first established by a single butterfly roosting consecutively in the same location that later recruits butterflies, 3) males depart roosts earlier than females in the morning, 4) older butterflies tend to roost on the same perch in the same roost every night, 5) roost-mates share the same resource traplines, and 6) most butterflies in a population participate in roosts. These observations present an improved portrait of Heliconius roosting and raise several new questions about this behavior.

Susan D. Finkbeiner "Communal Roosting in Heliconius Butterflies (Nymphalidae): Roost Recruitment, Establishment, Fidelity, and Resource Use Trends Based on Age and Sex," The Journal of the Lepidopterists' Society 68(1), (1 March 2014). https://doi.org/10.18473/lepi.v68i1.a2
Received: 16 August 2013; Accepted: 16 August 2013; Published: 1 March 2014
JOURNAL ARTICLE
7 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top