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1 June 2004 MOVEMENTS AND HOME RANGE OF BRUSH MICE
Amy B. Gottesman, Paul R. Krausman, Michael L. Morrison, Yar Petryszyn
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Abstract

In southeastern Arizona, brush mice (Peromyscus boylii) are the primary carriers of Sin Nombre virus, the etiologic agent for the disease hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in humans. Due to the lack of available literature on brush mouse movements, we were interested in determining the probability of mice entering human habitations. We examined movements and home range size of radiocollared brush mice on the Santa Rita Experimental Range, 48 km south of Tucson, Arizona (31°50′N, 110°50′W). We compared movements among seasons (i.e., spring, January to April; summer, May to August; winter, September to December), and between sex and animals living near (≤200 m) versus far from human structures (e.g., cabins, sheds). We did not detect any significant differences in movements or home range size among seasons, or between sex or proximity to artificial structures. Brush mice, on average, moved 17.7 m between consecutive locations (≥3 hr apart). Annually, the average size of home range areas was 0.12 ha. On average, brush mice made small-scale movements within their home range. We found little evidence that brush mice sought human dwellings.

Amy B. Gottesman, Paul R. Krausman, Michael L. Morrison, and Yar Petryszyn "MOVEMENTS AND HOME RANGE OF BRUSH MICE," The Southwestern Naturalist 49(2), 289-294, (1 June 2004). https://doi.org/10.1894/0038-4909(2004)049<0289:MAHROB>2.0.CO;2
Accepted: 22 August 2003; Published: 1 June 2004
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