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1 March 2010 Ecology of Western Pond Turtles (Actinemys marmorata) at Sewage-Treatment Facilities in the San Joaquin Valley, California
David J. Germano
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Abstract

The western pond turtle (Actinemys marmorata) has lost most of its habitat in the Central Valley of California to agricultural activities, flood control, and urbanization. Although a few areas still support this turtle, most habitats are now altered by humans. Aquatic habitats near population centers also may become release sites for a variety of introduced turtles, which could compete with the native A. marmorata. In 1999, 2002, and 2007, I trapped at the Fresno and Hanford wastewater-treatment facilities to determine presence and numbers of A. marmorata at settling ponds in these facilities. I caught 213 A. marmorata at Fresno and 106 at Hanford. No other species of turtles was caught. Turtles at both sites grew rapidly and had a mean size of clutch of 8.2 (Fresno) and 8.5 eggs (Hanford), which are the highest mean size of clutch reported for this species. Although not esthetically appealing to people, both sewage-treatment facilities provide habitat for A. marmorata and these could provide stock for future reintroductions of this species to more natural, rehabilitated aquatic habitats in nearby areas.

David J. Germano "Ecology of Western Pond Turtles (Actinemys marmorata) at Sewage-Treatment Facilities in the San Joaquin Valley, California," The Southwestern Naturalist 55(1), 89-97, (1 March 2010). https://doi.org/10.1894/GC-196.1
Received: 15 May 2008; Accepted: 1 June 2009; Published: 1 March 2010
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