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1 March 2010 Effects of Prescribed Fire on Winter Assemblages of Birds in Ponderosa Pine Forests of Northern Arizona
Theresa L. Pope, William M. Block
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Abstract

Studies of birds in winter are rare in wildlife ecology despite winter being a critical time for birds. We examined winter assemblages of birds in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests of northern Arizona following prescribed fire. We conducted point counts on two study sites in northern Arizona from mid-October to mid-March 2004–2006. Each site had one unit treated by prescribed fire a full growing season before the point counts began, paired with control unit(s) of similar structure. We detected 39 species during the survey. Nine species comprised 81% of all detections; eight of these were year-round residents of the area. Dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis) were the most numerous, comprising 23% of all detections. Assemblages were similar between treatments (Sorenson similarity index  =  0.85) and years (Sorenson similarity index  =  0.85), and rank abundance of species between burn and control units were correlated (Spearman's ρ  =  0.83). Therefore, assemblages of birds in winter were similar among areas treated by prescribed fire and unburned areas of ponderosa pine forests in northern Arizona.

Theresa L. Pope and William M. Block "Effects of Prescribed Fire on Winter Assemblages of Birds in Ponderosa Pine Forests of Northern Arizona," The Southwestern Naturalist 55(1), 22-28, (1 March 2010). https://doi.org/10.1894/MH-47.1
Received: 14 December 2007; Accepted: 1 May 2009; Published: 1 March 2010
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