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22 May 2019 Wild Felids in Temperate Forest Remnants in An Avocado Plantation Landscape in Michoacán, Mexico
Tiberio C. Monterrubio-Rico, Juan F. Charre-Medellín, Eduardo I. López-Ortiz
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Abstract

Temperate forests in the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt in Michoacán are threatened by a high conversion rate into avocado plantations, which researchers believe eliminates local fauna. Using camera traps, we obtained evidence of periodic mountain lion (Puma concolor) activity, and occasional presence of margay (Leopardus wiedii) and bobcat (Lynx rufus). The mountain lion records constitute the first evidence confirming the species presence in temperate forests in this region. The margay is an endangered species, and its presence constitutes the first record for a temperate forest fragment in an avocado plantation landscape. Felidae presence is evidence that the conservation of entire mammal assemblages is still possible in partially transformed landscapes in the region.

Tiberio C. Monterrubio-Rico, Juan F. Charre-Medellín, and Eduardo I. López-Ortiz "Wild Felids in Temperate Forest Remnants in An Avocado Plantation Landscape in Michoacán, Mexico," The Southwestern Naturalist 63(2), 137-142, (22 May 2019). https://doi.org/10.1894/0038-4909-63-2-137
Received: 26 July 2016; Accepted: 23 August 2018; Published: 22 May 2019
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