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1 June 2005 BREEDING ECOLOGY OF WHITE-WINGED DOVES IN A RECENTLY COLONIZED URBAN ENVIRONMENT
MICHAEL F. SMALL, CYNTHIA L. SCHAEFER, JOHN T. BACCUS, JAY A. ROBERSON
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Abstract

Using field-implanted subcutaneous radio transmitters, we monitored the breeding biology of White-winged Doves (Zenaida asiatica) in a recently colonized urban area (Waco, Texas). We implanted transmitters in June 2002 (n = 39; 16 males, 23 females) and February and March 2003 (n = 40; 17 males, 17 females, 6 unknown sex), and tracked radio-tagged doves every 3rd day until transmitters no longer functioned (90–120 days). We tracked 26 doves to 36 nests in nine tree species. The maximum number of nesting attempts was four. Nest success of first and second nesting attempts was 62 and 24%, respectively, and overall nest success for both years combined was 52%. Mean nest height—as a proportion of tree height—ranged from 0.31 to 0.75. Urban White-winged Doves had an extended breeding season; nesting attempts occurred both before and after the traditional dove breeding period in native brush habitats of the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas. Field-implantation of subcutaneous radio transmitters was a viable technique for monitoring nesting activities of White-winged Doves.

MICHAEL F. SMALL, CYNTHIA L. SCHAEFER, JOHN T. BACCUS, and JAY A. ROBERSON "BREEDING ECOLOGY OF WHITE-WINGED DOVES IN A RECENTLY COLONIZED URBAN ENVIRONMENT," The Wilson Bulletin 117(2), 172-176, (1 June 2005). https://doi.org/10.1676/04-085
Received: 20 August 2004; Accepted: 1 March 2005; Published: 1 June 2005
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