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1 September 2007 Yellow-breasted Chat and Gray Catbird Productivity in a Fragmented Western Riparian System
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Abstract

We studied the effects of habitat fragmentation on productivity of Yellow-breasted Chat (Icteria virens) and Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis) in southern British Columbia in a western riparian ecosystem. Nesting dates were later in isolated habitat patches than in continuous habitat patches for both species. We found no direct evidence that habitat fragmentation decreased productivity in either species. Average fecundity did not significantly differ between continuous (2.54 fledglings for Gray Catbird; 1.78 and 1.67 fledglings for Yellow-breasted Chat in 2002 and 2003, respectively) and isolated sites (1.33 fledglings for Gray Catbird; 1.78 and 0.87 fledglings for Yellow-breasted Chat in 2002 and 2003, respectively). Territory size, as measured by mapping perch locations for breeding adults, was smaller for Yellow-breasted Chats breeding in the Okanagan Valley (0.25 ha) than for chats in mid and high-density southern populations. However, overall fecundity and nest success were similar to more southerly populations. These results suggest that both species can persist in a relatively fragmented ecosystem.

Tawna C. Morgan, Christine A. Bishop, and TONY D. WILLIAMS "Yellow-breasted Chat and Gray Catbird Productivity in a Fragmented Western Riparian System," The Wilson Journal of Ornithology 119(3), 494-498, (1 September 2007). https://doi.org/10.1676/05-071.1
Received: 30 June 2005; Accepted: 1 October 2006; Published: 1 September 2007
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