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1 September 2009 Foraging Behavior of Tufted Tit-Tyrants (Anairetes parulus) in Semiarid Northcentral Chile
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Abstract

We studied foraging behavior of Tufted Tit-Tyrants (Anairetes parulus) in Matorral (shrubland) habitat of northcentral Chile. This species is a generalist insectivore feeding in most shrubs of Matorral habitat at our study site, although they favored three of the dominant plant species. Their foraging is typical of small tyrannid flycatchers, using rapid perch gleans coupled with hover gleans and supplemented by flycatching. They use relatively long search periods (3–5 sec) followed by rapid gleans, which is typical for small tyrannids. Their active foraging (3.1 ± 1.8 prey attacks/min) coupled with a longer search time distinguishes them from parids or regulids of the Holarctic with which they often are compared. They generally forage singly or in pairs and aggressively defend what appears to be foraging territories in winter and summer. Densities of Tufted Tit-Tyrants at our study site were higher than reported in other studies from Chile and Argentina, presumably reflecting resource availability.

Andrew Engilis and Douglas A. Kelt "Foraging Behavior of Tufted Tit-Tyrants (Anairetes parulus) in Semiarid Northcentral Chile," The Wilson Journal of Ornithology 121(3), (1 September 2009). https://doi.org/10.1676/08-040.1
Received: 3 March 2008; Accepted: 1 February 2009; Published: 1 September 2009
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