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1 July 2010 Lack of Gender Bias in Citation Rates of Publications by Dendrochronologists: What is Unique about this Discipline?
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Abstract

Most academic disciplines have a gender bias that exists in the recognition of research publications: women's publications are cited at lower rates than men's publications. In this paper, we examined whether a similar gender bias existed for publications by dendrochronologists. Tree-ring research is a fairly small field where males outnumber females, and therefore the sample size was limited to 20 female dendrochronologists and 20 male dendrochronologists. It was determined that native language (English or non-native English speaker), current employment (government or academic), and gender of the first-author do not significantly influence a paper's probability of being cited. However, years since dissertation completion was a good predictor of a paper's citation rate. We suggest that the high productivity of female dendrochronologists and a pattern of co-authoring with male colleagues bring the work of females to the attention of their male colleagues and thus eliminate the gender bias in citation of women's work common to other disciplines.

Carolyn A. Copenheaver, Kyrille Goldbeck, and Paolo Cherubini "Lack of Gender Bias in Citation Rates of Publications by Dendrochronologists: What is Unique about this Discipline?," Tree-Ring Research 66(2), 127-133, (1 July 2010). https://doi.org/10.3959/2009-10.1
Received: 21 July 2009; Accepted: 22 February 2010; Published: 1 July 2010
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