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1 October 2003 Effect of Postemergence Glyphosate Application Timing on Weed Control and Grain Yield in Glyphosate-Resistant Corn: Results of a 2-Yr Multistate Study
STEVEN A. GOWER, MARK M. LOUX, JOHN CARDINA, S. KENT HARRISON, PAUL L. SPRANKLE, NORMAN J. PROBST, THOMAS T. BAUMAN, WAYNE BUGG, W. S. CURRAN, RANDALL S. CURRIE, R. GORDON HARVEY, WILLIAM G. JOHNSON, JAMES J. KELLS, MICHEAL D. K. OWEN, DAVID L. REGEHR, CHARLES H. SLACK, MARVIN SPAUR, CHRISTY L. SPRAGUE, MARK VANGESSEL, BRYAN G. YOUNG
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Abstract

Field studies were conducted at 35 sites throughout the north-central United States in 1998 and 1999 to determine the effect of postemergence glyphosate application timing on weed control and grain yield in glyphosate-resistant corn. Glyphosate was applied at various timings based on the height of the most dominant weed species. Weed control and corn grain yields were considerably more variable when glyphosate was applied only once. The most effective and consistent season-long annual grass and broadleaf weed control occurred when a single glyphosate application was delayed until weeds were 15 cm or taller. Two glyphosate applications provided more consistent weed control when weeds were 10 cm tall or less and higher corn grain yields when weeds were 5 cm tall or less, compared with a single application. Weed control averaged at least 94 and 97% across all sites in 1998 and 1999, respectively, with two glyphosate applications but was occasionally less than 70% because of late emergence of annual grass and Amaranthus spp. or reduced control of Ipomoea spp. With a single application of glyphosate, corn grain yield was most often reduced when the application was delayed until weeds were 23 cm or taller. Averaged across all sites in 1998 and 1999, corn grain yields from a single glyphosate application at the 5-, 10-, 15-, 23-, and 30-cm timings were 93, 94, 93, 91, and 79% of the weed-free control, respectively. There was a significant effect of herbicide treatment on corn grain yield in 23 of the 35 sites when weed reinfestation was prevented with a second glyphosate application. When weed reinfestation was prevented, corn grain yield at the 5-, 10-, and 15-cm application timings was 101, 97, and 93% of the weed-free control, respectively, averaged across all sites. Results of this study suggested that the optimum timing for initial glyphosate application to avoid corn grain yield loss was when weeds were less than 10 cm in height, no more than 23 d after corn planting, and when corn growth was not more advanced than the V4 stage.

Nomenclature: Glyphosate; Amaranthus spp. #3 AMASS; Ipomoea spp. # IPOSS; corn, Zea mays L. ‘Roundup Ready®’ # SETFA.

Additional index words: Herbicide-resistant crops, weed interference.

Abbreviation: POST, postemergence.

STEVEN A. GOWER, MARK M. LOUX, JOHN CARDINA, S. KENT HARRISON, PAUL L. SPRANKLE, NORMAN J. PROBST, THOMAS T. BAUMAN, WAYNE BUGG, W. S. CURRAN, RANDALL S. CURRIE, R. GORDON HARVEY, WILLIAM G. JOHNSON, JAMES J. KELLS, MICHEAL D. K. OWEN, DAVID L. REGEHR, CHARLES H. SLACK, MARVIN SPAUR, CHRISTY L. SPRAGUE, MARK VANGESSEL, and BRYAN G. YOUNG "Effect of Postemergence Glyphosate Application Timing on Weed Control and Grain Yield in Glyphosate-Resistant Corn: Results of a 2-Yr Multistate Study," Weed Technology 17(4), 821-828, (1 October 2003). https://doi.org/10.1614/P02-200
Published: 1 October 2003
JOURNAL ARTICLE
8 PAGES


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