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1 October 2003 Efficacy and Economics of Weed Control Programs in Glyphosate-Resistant Potato (Solanum tuberosum)
PAMELA J. S. HUTCHINSON, DENNIS J. TONKS, BRENT R. BEUTLER
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Abstract

Field studies were conducted to evaluate weed control, tuber yield, gross return, economic return on investment (EROI), and net return in glyphosate-resistant ‘Ranger Russet’ potato in 2000 and 2001 at the University of Idaho Aberdeen Research and Extension Center near Aberdeen, ID. Three types of weed control programs were evaluated: a total glyphosate program of single or sequential applications (TGLY), tank mixtures of glyphosate and residual herbicides applied early postemergence (GLY RES EPOST), and residual preemergence herbicides followed by (fb) a late postemergence glyphosate application (RES PRE fb LPOST GLY). A standard rimsulfuron metribuzin nonionic surfactant EPOST treatment was included for comparison. The standard EPOST treatment and all glyphosate-containing treatments controlled hairy nightshade 88 to 99%. RES PRE fb LPOST GLY treatments improved hairy nightshade control compared with the RES PRE components applied alone. All herbicide treatments controlled kochia 87 to 99% and green foxtail 87 to 100%. Redroot pigweed and common lambsquarters were controlled ≥85 and ≥89%, respectively, by all herbicide treatments except a single EPOST application of glyphosate at 420 g ae/ha. Depending on the year, sequential applications of glyphosate, GLY RES EPOST, or RES PRE fb GLY LPOST treatments controlled weeds better than single EPOST glyphosate applications. Single LPOST glyphosate applications generally controlled kochia, redroot pigweed, common lambsquarters, and green foxtail better than single EPOST applications. However, single EPOST glyphosate applications controlled hairy nightshade better than a single LPOST application of glyphosate at 420 g/ha. RES PRE fb GLY LPOST treatments improved redroot pigweed, common lambsquarters, and green foxtail control, compared with the RES PRE components applied alone, depending on the RES PRE component and the year. Sequential applications of glyphosate at 840 g ae/ha and the standard nonglyphosate EPOST, GLY RES EPOST, and RES PRE fb GLY LPOST treatments generally provided similar weed control. No crop injury was observed as a result of any herbicide treatment. Sequential applications of glyphosate at 840 g/ha had better tuber yields and economic returns than a single EPOST or LPOST application of glyphosate at 420 g/ha or a single LPOST application of glyphosate at 840 g/ha. A single EPOST application of glyphosate at 420 g/ha had lower tuber yields and economic returns than a single EPOST application of glyphosate at 840 g/ha. The RES PRE alone treatments, except metribuzin pendimethalin, had similar tuber yields, EROI, and net returns as sequential applications of glyphosate at 840 g/ha. Glyphosate rimsulfuron resulted in lower tuber yields than sequential applications of glyphosate at 840 g/ha, whereas EROI and net returns were similar. All other combinations of glyphosate and residual herbicides except glyphosate pendimethalin EPOST, had similar tuber yields, EROI, and net returns as sequential applications of glyphosate at 840 g/ha.

Nomenclature: Glyphosate; metribuzin; pendimethalin; rimsulfuron; common lambsquarters, Chenopodium album L. #3 CHEAL; green foxtail, Setaria viridis (L.) Beauv. # SETVI; hairy nightshade, Solanum sarrachoides L. Sendt. # SOLSA; kochia, Kochia scoparia L. Shrad. # KCHSC; redroot pigweed, Amaranthus retroflexus L. # AMARE; potato, Solanum tuberosum L. ‘Ranger Russet’.

Additional index words: Economic return on investment, gross return, net return, sequential, tuber yield.

Abbreviations: AMS, ammonium sulfate; EPOST, early postemergence; EROI, economic return on

PAMELA J. S. HUTCHINSON, DENNIS J. TONKS, and BRENT R. BEUTLER "Efficacy and Economics of Weed Control Programs in Glyphosate-Resistant Potato (Solanum tuberosum)," Weed Technology 17(4), 854-865, (1 October 2003). https://doi.org/10.1614/wt-03-015r2
Published: 1 October 2003
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