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1 July 2004 Emergence and Growth of Trumpetcreeper (Campsis radicans) as Affected by Rootstock Size and Planting Depth
JEFFREY T. EDWARDS, LAWRENCE R. OLIVER
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Abstract

Trumpetcreeper, a deciduous, perennial vine found in the midwestern and southeastern United States, causes crop losses through direct competition and by crop entanglement, and control measures include both herbicides and tillage. The regenerative capacity of trumpetcreeper rootstocks of varying length and diameter when planted at different depths was evaluated in greenhouse experiments in Arkansas. Deeper placement of rootstocks delayed trumpetcreeper emergence but had no effect on shoot growth after emergence. Larger rootstock segments produced more shoots per plant and more total biomass production. However, smaller rootstock segments produced more shoots and total biomass per centimeter of rootstock. Overall, decreasing trumpetcreeper rootstock size will delay shoot emergence but may not result in increased long-term control.

Nomenclature: Trumpetcreeper, Campsis radicans (L.) Seem ex Bureau #3 CMIRA.

Additional index words: Perennial vine control, tillage, vegetative propagation.

JEFFREY T. EDWARDS and LAWRENCE R. OLIVER "Emergence and Growth of Trumpetcreeper (Campsis radicans) as Affected by Rootstock Size and Planting Depth," Weed Technology 18(3), 816-819, (1 July 2004). https://doi.org/10.1614/WT-03-213R
Published: 1 July 2004
JOURNAL ARTICLE
4 PAGES


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