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1 January 2006 Evaluation of Postemergence Weed Control Strategies in Herbicide-Resistant Isolines of Corn (Zea mays)
KAREN A. ZUVER, MARK L. BERNARDS, JAMES J. KELLS, CHRISTY L. SPRAGUE, CASE R. MEDLIN, MARK M. LOUX
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Abstract

Herbicide-resistant corn hybrids offer additional options for POST weed control in corn, and growers may benefit from information on the consistency of these weed-control strategies. Studies were conducted in Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, and Ohio, in 2000 and 2001, to evaluate weed control among herbicide strategies for imidazolinone-resistant, glufosinate-resistant, glyphosate-resistant, and conventional corn. Isogenic hybrids were utilized to minimize variation in growth and yield potential among hybrids. The glyphosate-resistant corn postemergence (glyphosate-POST) treatment provided more consistent control of giant foxtail than the PRE, conventional corn postemergence (conventional-POST), glufosinate-resistant corn postemergence (glufosinate-POST), and imidazolinone-resistant corn postemergence (imi-POST) treatments. All four POST treatments were more consistent and provided greater control than the PRE treatment of the large-seeded broadleaf weeds velvetleaf, giant ragweed, common cocklebur, and morningglory species. Conventional-POST and imi-POST were more consistent than glufosinate-POST and glyphosate-POST treatments in controlling giant ragweed. There were no statistical differences in the variability of PRE or POST treatments for control of common lambsquarters, common ragweed, and redroot pigweed. Corn yield varied among locations and years. The glyphosate-POST treatment did not reduce yield relative to the weed-free treatment, the imi-POST and glufosinate-POST treatments each reduced yield in one of eight locations, and the conventional-POST treatment reduced yield in three of eight locations.

Nomenclature: Metolachlor; atrazine; nicosulfuron; rimsulfuron; dicamba; imazethapyr; imazapyr; glufosinate; glyphosate; common cocklebur, Xanthium strumarium L. #3 XANST; common lambsquarters, Chenopodium album L. # CHEAL; common ragweed, Ambrosia artemisiifolia L. # AMBEL; giant foxtail, Setaria faberi (L.) Herrm. # SETFA; giant ragweed, Ambrosia trifida L. # AMBTR; morningglory species, Ipomea spp. # IPOSS; redroot pigweed, Amaranthus retroflexus L. # AMARE; velvetleaf, Abutilon theophrasti Medicus # ABUTH; corn, Zea mays L. # ZEAMX.

Additional index words: Corn yield, herbicide-resistant crop, herbicide system, Ipomea species, conventional corn, imidazolinone.

Abbreviations: AMS, ammonium sulfate; crm, comparative relative maturity; DAP, days after postemergence.

KAREN A. ZUVER, MARK L. BERNARDS, JAMES J. KELLS, CHRISTY L. SPRAGUE, CASE R. MEDLIN, and MARK M. LOUX "Evaluation of Postemergence Weed Control Strategies in Herbicide-Resistant Isolines of Corn (Zea mays)," Weed Technology 20(1), 172-178, (1 January 2006). https://doi.org/10.1614/WT-04-253R1.1
Published: 1 January 2006
JOURNAL ARTICLE
7 PAGES


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