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1 April 2006 Changes in Herbicide Use Patterns and Production Practices Resulting from Glyphosate-Resistant Crops
BRYAN G. YOUNG
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Abstract

Recent shifts in herbicide use patterns can be attributed to rapid, large-scale adoption of glyphosate-resistant soybean and cotton. A dramatic increase in glyphosate use is the most obvious change associated with the adoption of glyphosate-resistant crops. Consequently, the diversity of herbicides used for weed management in these crops has declined, particularly in soybean. To date, the availability of glyphosate-resistant corn has limited the use of glyphosate in corn. While exploiting the benefits of glyphosate-resistant crops, many growers have abandoned the principles of sound weed and herbicide-resistance management. Instead of incorporating glyphosate into a resistance management strategy utilizing multiple herbicide sites of action, many growers rely exclusively upon glyphosate for weed control. Although it is difficult to establish a clear relationship between the adoption of glyphosate-resistant crops and changes in other crop production practices, the increase in no-till and strip-till production of cotton and soybean between 1995 and 2002 may have been facilitated by glyphosate-resistant crops.

Nomenclature: Glyphosate; corn, Zea mays L.; cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L.; soybean, Glycine max L.

Additional key words: Application timing, herbicide-resistance management, mode of action, site of action, tank mixtures, tillage, weed management strategies.

BRYAN G. YOUNG "Changes in Herbicide Use Patterns and Production Practices Resulting from Glyphosate-Resistant Crops," Weed Technology 20(2), 301-307, (1 April 2006). https://doi.org/10.1614/WT-04-189.1
Published: 1 April 2006
JOURNAL ARTICLE
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