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1 July 2006 Growth, Reproduction, and Management of Chinese Yam (Dioscorea oppositifolia)
CHRISTOPHER L. MAIN, JOSEPH E. BEELER, DARREN K. ROBINSON, THOMAS C. MUELLER
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Abstract

Chinese yam is an exotic perennial vine that invades natural areas in the temperate regions of the eastern United States. Research was conducted from 2001 to 2004 to evaluate growth, reproduction, and management options for this weed. Vine length, lateral shoot production, and reproductive capacity were lower in the first year of growth compared to 2 subsequent years. During the second and third growing season, plants were more mature and tended to flower earlier and produce larger bulbils compared to the first growing season. Maximum vine length was not reached prior to frost in the first year and was approximately 480 cm in each of the subsequent years. Both glyphosate and triclopyr were effective in controlling plants growing from bulbils and plants growing from tubers. Triclopyr did not display acropetal translocation, in that only the treated tissue died. However, both products displayed excellent basipetal translocation resulting in elimination of tubers and no shoot regrowth the year following treatment. Native area managers should attempt to eradicate small populations of Chinese yam prior to establishment of an extensive tuber system.

Nomenclature: Chinese yam, Dioscorea oppositifolia L.; glyphosate, triclopyr.

Additional index words: Cinnamon vine, Dioscorea batatas, exotic plants, invasive plants, nagaimo, natural areas.

Abbreviations: GDD, growing degree days; NIS, nonionic surfactant.

CHRISTOPHER L. MAIN, JOSEPH E. BEELER, DARREN K. ROBINSON, and THOMAS C. MUELLER "Growth, Reproduction, and Management of Chinese Yam (Dioscorea oppositifolia)," Weed Technology 20(3), 773-777, (1 July 2006). https://doi.org/10.1614/WT-04-243R2.1
Published: 1 July 2006
JOURNAL ARTICLE
5 PAGES


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