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1 April 2012 Dose Response of Glyphosate and Dicamba on Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) Injury
Greg R. Kruger, William G. Johnson, Douglas J. Doohan, Stephen C. Weller
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Abstract

Field studies were conducted to determine the response of sublethal glyphosate and dicamba doses to processing tomato flowering loss and marketable yield. Dose–response studies for both herbicides were conducted on four commercial processing tomato lines (two different lines within each study) and plants were sprayed at either the vegetative stage or the early bloom stage. Both glyphosate and dicamba caused higher yield losses when sprayed at the early bloom stage. A 25% yield loss was observed with 8.5 and 7.5 g ae ha−1 for glyphosate and dicamba, respectively, at the early bloom stage and 43.9 and 11.9 g ae ha−1 for glyphosate and dicamba, respectively, at the early vegetative stage. Overall, these tomato cultivars were more sensitive to dicamba than to glyphosate. We conclude that glyphosate and dicamba drift could have serious implications on tomato yields especially if the drift occurs during flowering.

Nomenclature: Glyphosate; dicamba; tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.

Weed Science Society of America
Greg R. Kruger, William G. Johnson, Douglas J. Doohan, and Stephen C. Weller "Dose Response of Glyphosate and Dicamba on Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) Injury," Weed Technology 26(2), 256-260, (1 April 2012). https://doi.org/10.1614/WT-D-11-00073.1
Received: 27 May 2011; Accepted: 1 November 2011; Published: 1 April 2012
JOURNAL ARTICLE
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KEYWORDS
Dose response
herbicide drift
yield reduction
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