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1 November 2018 Monitoring post-release survival of the northern corroboree frog, Pseudophryne pengilleyi, using environmental DNA
Jack Rojahn, Dianne Gleeson, Elise M. Furlan
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Abstract

Context. Translocations are becoming an increasingly important conservation tool to combat rising levels of species extinction. Unfortunately, many translocation efforts fail; yet, the timing and cause of failure often remain unknown. Monitoring individuals in the days and weeks following release can provide valuable information on their capacity to survive this initial hurdle. In Australia, breeding programs have been established for the endangered northern corroboree frog, Pseudophryne pengilleyi, to enable reintroduction to the wild via captive-reared individuals, typically, early life stages such as eggs or juvenile frogs that cannot be monitored via traditional survey methods that target adult frogs (e.g. shout–response). Environmental DNA (eDNA) detects trace amounts of DNA that organisms release into their environment and could provide a means to infer population persistence for wildlife releases and translocations.

© CSIRO 2018
Jack Rojahn, Dianne Gleeson, and Elise M. Furlan "Monitoring post-release survival of the northern corroboree frog, Pseudophryne pengilleyi, using environmental DNA," Wildlife Research 45(7), 620-626, (1 November 2018). https://doi.org/10.1071/WR17179
Received: 8 December 2017; Accepted: 20 September 2018; Published: 1 November 2018
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