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1 October 2006 Quality of Water Available to Wildlife in Desert Environments: Comparisons Among Anthropogenic and Natural Sources
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Abstract

We compared water quality at natural tinajas and 2 types of wildlife water developments in the deserts of southeastern California, USA. We analyzed water samples collected from each site for pH, conductivity, alkalinity, aluminum, ammonium, arsenic, cadmium, calcium (Ca), chloride, chromium, copper (Cu), iron, lead (Pb), manganese, magnesium (Mg), mercury, nickel, nitrate, organophosphate, potassium, silica, silver, sodium, sulfate, and zinc (Zn). With few exceptions, values for pH were within standards established for livestock drinking water. The levels of Ca, Cu, Pb, Mg, silica, and Zn differed by type of water source. We believe those differences are related to construction materials, design, or substrate. With the exception of pH, none of the analytes tested for exceeded standards recommended for livestock drinking water. We conclude that the quality of water available at man-made water sources in southeastern California desert environments does not constitute a wildlife health threat.

VERNON C. BLEICH, NANCY G. ANDREW, MARIDA J. MARTIN, GERALD P. MULCAHY, ANDREW M. PAULI, and STEVEN S. ROSENSTOCK "Quality of Water Available to Wildlife in Desert Environments: Comparisons Among Anthropogenic and Natural Sources," Wildlife Society Bulletin 34(3), 627-632, (1 October 2006). https://doi.org/10.2193/0091-7648(2006)34[627:QOWATW]2.0.CO;2
Published: 1 October 2006
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