Translator Disclaimer
1 October 2006 Frequency and Distribution of Highway Crossings by Kenai Peninsula Brown Bears
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Highway construction and expansion in bear habitat can negatively affect brown bear (Ursus arctos) populations. We analyzed radiotelemetry data from previous studies to determine the spatial and temporal distribution of brown bear crossings of the Sterling and Seward highways on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska, USA. We compared highway crossings of actual bears to simulated bears to determine whether the highway acted as a barrier and whether crossing locations were spatially clustered. Four of 13 bears monitored crossed the highway less frequently than expected. While locations where bears crossed the highway were clustered, none of the spatial models we developed strongly explained the observed clustering. Bears were more likely to cross the highway during nighttime than daytime. When bears crossed the highway, they moved more rapidly and acutely than they did prior to or after the crossing. Further study is needed to determine the appropriate number and location for placement of highway-crossing structures in this region

TABITHA A. GRAVES, SEAN FARLEY, and CHRISTOPHER SERVHEEN "Frequency and Distribution of Highway Crossings by Kenai Peninsula Brown Bears," Wildlife Society Bulletin 34(3), 800-808, (1 October 2006). https://doi.org/10.2193/0091-7648(2006)34[800:FADOHC]2.0.CO;2
Published: 1 October 2006
JOURNAL ARTICLE
9 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top