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30 November 2021 Euro+Med-Checklist Notulae, 14
Eckhard von Raab-Straube, Thomas Raus
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

This is the fourteenth of a series of miscellaneous contributions, by various authors, where hitherto unpublished data relevant to both the Med-Checklist and the Euro+Med (or Sisyphus) projects are presented. This instalment deals with the families Apocynaceae, Compositae, Crassulaceae, Cyperaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Gramineae, Leguminosae, Nyctaginaceae, Onagraceae, Orobanchaceae, Rubiaceae, Solanaceae and Umbelliferae. It includes new country and area records and taxonomic and distributional considerations for taxa in Acalypha, Bupleurum, Carex, Datura, Epilobium, Eragrostis, Galium, Leontodon, Mirabilis, Nerium, Orobanche, Phelipanche, Rhinanthus, Saccharum, Sedum, Trifolium, Tripleurospermum and Willemetia.

Citation

For the whole article:

Raab-Straube E. von & Raus Th. (ed.) 2021: Euro+Med-Checklist Notulae, 14. – Willdenowia 51: 355–369.

For a single contribution (example):

Bergmeier E. 2021: Leontodon longirostris (Finch & P. D. Sell) Talavera – Pp. 356–357 in: Raab-Straube E. von & Raus Th. (ed.), Euro+Med-Checklist Notulae, 14. – Willdenowia 51: 355–369. https://doi.org/10.3372/wi.51.51304

Version of record first published online on 30 November 2021 ahead of inclusion in December 2021 issue.

Notice

A succinct description of the Euro+Med project, with a list of recognized territories and their abbreviations, and the conventions used to indicate the status and presence of taxa, can be found in the introduction to the first instalment of the Euro+Med Notulae (Greuter & Raab-Straube 2005: 223–226) and on the Euro+Med PlantBase website (Euro+Med 2006+). For the previous instalment of the Euro+Med-Checklist Notulae, see Raab-Straube & Raus (2021).

Contributors

E. Bergmeier, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Albrecht-von-Haller-Institut für Pflanzenwissenschaften, Untere Karspüle 2, 37073 Göttingen, Germany; erwin.bergmeier@bio.uni-goettingen.de

J. Bienvenu, Modi, Platanias, 73014 Crete, Greece; jean@west-crete.com

V. V. Byalt, Komarov Botanical Institute of RAS, Prof. Popova Str. 2, 197376 St. Petersburg, Russian Federation; byalt66@mail.ru, vbyalt@binran.ru

Ch. Charalampidou, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Faculty of Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Environment, School of Forestry and Natural Environment, Laboratory of Forest Botany – Geobotany, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece; charachara@for.auth.gr

R. Ćušterevska, Institute of Biology, Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University, 3 Arhimedova Str., 1000 Skopje, North Macedonia; renatapmf@yahoo.com

R. Di Pietro, Department PDTA, University of Rome Sapienza, via Flaminia 72, 00196 Rome, Italy; romeo.dipietro@uniroma1.it

D. S. Dimitrov, National Natural Historical Museum, 1 Tsar Osvoboditel Blvd., 1000 Sofia, Bulgaria; dimitrov.npm@gmail.com

E. Eleftheriadou, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Faculty of Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Environment, School of Forestry and Natural Environment, Laboratory of Forest Botany – Geobotany, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece; eelefthe@for.auth.gr

A. V. Fateryga, T. I. Vyazemsky Karadag Scientific Station, Nature Reserve of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Branch of A. O. Kovalevsky Institute of Biology of the Southern Seas, Nauki Str. 24, Kurortnoye, Feodosiya 298188, Crimea; fater_84@list.ru

V. V. Fateryga, T. I. Vyazemsky Karadag Scientific Station, Nature Reserve of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Branch of A. O. Kovalevsky Institute of Biology of the Southern Seas, Nauki Str. 24, Kurortnoye, Feodosiya 298188, Crimea; valentina_vt@mail.ru

Th. Giannakis, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Faculty of Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Environment, School of Forestry and Natural Environment, Laboratory of Forest Botany – Geobotany, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece; thomgianna@hotmail.com

D. Iamonico, Department PDTA, University of Rome Sapienza, via Flaminia 72, 00196 Rome, Italy; d.iamonico@yahoo.it

J. Krause, Jonasstr. 48, 12053 Berlin, Germany; josi.krause@mail.de

A. Mercadé, Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Biologia Evolutiva, Ecologia i Ciències Ambientals, Av. Diagonal 643, 08028 Barcelona, Spain; arnaumerc77@hotmail.com

P. Novák, Department of Botany and Zoology, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 61137 Brno, Czech Republic; pavenow@seznam.cz

A. Pérez-Haase, Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Biologia Evolutiva, Ecologia i Ciencies Ambientals, Av. Diagonal 643, 08028 Barcelona, Spain; and Universitat de Vic-Universitat Central de Catalunya, Departament de Biociències, C. de la Laura 13, 08500 Vic, Spain; aaronperez@ub.edu

M. R. Perna, Ente Parco Regionale Monti Aurunci, viale Glorioso 10, 0420 Campodimele (LT), Italy; mrperna@regione.lazio.it

R. Piwowarczyk, Center for Research and Conservation of Biodiversity, Department of Environmental Biology, Institute of Biology, Jan Kochanowski University, Uniwersytecka 7, 25-406 Kielce, Poland; piwowarczyk@ujk.edu.pl

S. Rätzel, Georg-Friedrich-Händel-Str. 13, 15234 Frankfurt an der Oder, Germany; stefan.raetzel@googlemail.com

Th. Raus, Botanischer Garten und Botanisches Museum Berlin, Freie Universität Berlin, Königin-Luise-Str. 6–8, 14195 Berlin, Germany; t.raus@bo.berlin

M. Ristow, Universität Potsdam, Vegetationsökologie und Naturschutz, Am Mühlenberg 3, 14476 Potsdam, Germany; ristow@uni-potsdam.de

L. E. Ryff, Flora and Vegetation Laboratory, Nikitsky Botanical Garden – National Scientific Centre, Yalta, Crimea; ryffljub@ukr.net

Ó. Sánchez Pedraja, Grupo Botánico Cantábrico, ES-39722 Liérganes (Cantabria), Spain; osanchez@farmalierganes.com

S. Stoyanov, Department of Plant and Fungal Diversity and Resources, Institute of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Research, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., bl. 23, 1113 Sofia, Bulgaria; tjankata@abv.bg

S. A. Svirin, Flora and Vegetation Laboratory, Nikitsky Botanical Garden – National Scientific Centre, Yalta, Crimea; and Urban Development Institute, Sevastopol State University, Kornilova Emb. 1, Sevastopol 299011, Crimea; sapsan7@mail.ru

D. Szokala, Department of Botany and Zoology, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 61137 Brno, Czech Republic; 512772@muni.cz

K. Theodoropoulos, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Faculty of Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Environment, School of Forestry and Natural Environment, Laboratory of Forest Botany – Geobotany, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece; ktheodor@for.auth.gr

S. Tsiftsis, International Hellenic University, Department of Forest and Natural Environment Sciences, 66100 Drama, Greece; stsiftsis@for.ihu.gr

N. J. Turland, Botanischer Garten und Botanisches Museum Berlin, Freie Universität Berlin, Königin-Luise-Str. 6–8, 14195 Berlin, Germany; n.turland@bo.berlin

H. Uhlich, Gartenstr. 19, 56357 Welterod, Germany; uhlich.holger@googlemail.com

Apocynaceae

Nerium oleander L.

A Gg(G): Georgia: Tbilisi Region, Tbilisi, sidewalk in Metekhis Aghmarti street, near Metekhi church, 41°41′26″N, 44°48′44″E, c. 410 m, 20 Sep 2021, two young plants (c. 0.3 m high), Novák (photo [ Fig. S1 (wi.51.51304_Suppl_Fig_S1+S2.pdf), see Supplemental content online]). – Nerium oleander is one of the ornamental plants of Mediterranean origin cultivated across the lower elevations of Georgia. However, it has not been reported as a spontaneously escaping alien species there to date (Marhold 2011+a). It is widely planted in parks, gardens and road dividers in the city of Tbilisi, where it was newly discovered as a casual alien. The future spreading in the region is predictable due to its common cultivation, favourable climate and high production of wind-dispersed seeds. The species has the potential to invade similar habitats as in its native range, i.e. ravines and banks of (seasonal) streams (Henderson 1992). Due to the high conservation value of such habitats in Georgia (Kalníková & al. 2020), the further spreading of oleander should be monitored and controlled.

P. Novák

Compositae (Asteraceae)

Leontodon longirostris (Finch & P. D. Sell) Talavera (≡ L. taraxacoides subsp. longirostris Finch & P. D. Sell; = L. saxatilis subsp. rothii Maire; = Thrincia hispida (Roth) Roth).

+ Gr: Greece: North Aegean, Limnos (Lemnos) island, Diapori, 39°51.4′N, 25°10.4′E, 0–1 m, seasonally wet coastal grassland, sheep pasture, sandy ground, 15 May 2021, Bergmeier 21-207 (herb. Bergmeier). – Based on the gathered specimens, Leontodon longirostris is an overwintering annual or biennial; other sources noted a (weak) taproot indicating biennial to perennial life form. The population in Limnos consists of small plants (6–11 cm tall), usually single-stemmed and -headed, ebracteate, stems and leaves with mostly 2-fid, stalked hairs; involucral bracts 6–8; achenes dimorphic, the outer crowned with short, scarious, denticulate scales c. 0.5 mm long, some enclosed in inner involucral bracts; the inner 5–6 mm long, distinctly beaked for 2–3 mm (in contrast to L. saxatilis Lam.), with plumose pappus hairs c. 7 mm long, flattened and slightly widened at base. The intricate taxonomy has been discussed by Greuter (2003, as L. saxatilis subsp. rothii) and Talavera & al. (2015, under Thrincia hispida). Leontodon longirostris has been considered of W Mediterranean-Macaronesian distribution (Euro+Med 2006+; see also Talavera & Talavera 2017). However, in view of the Limnos record, reports of L. saxatilis and L. taraxacoides (Vill.) Mérat from the E Mediterranean may refer to L. longirostris. Leontodon saxatilis, which as Greuter (2003) argued has priority over L. taraxacoides, is in its strict sense a European species, which in the southeast reaches Bosnia and Herzegovina (Maslo & Šarić 2018, with photo) and Bulgaria (e.g. Dimitrova & al. 2005; Bancheva & al. 2012; Vladimirov 2018), where it occurs in urban habitats such as lawns. It was recently reported from a village site in N Peloponnisos (Tsakiri & al. 2020), but is apparently rare or absent in the Mediterranean. It differs from L. longirostris in its perennial life form and short or absent beak of inner achenes. According to the description by Kupicha (1975, “inner [achenes] beaked”) it seems likely that the reports of L. saxatilis in the Flora of Turkey area (Turkey-in-Europe, Lesvos) refer to L. longirostris, despite the notation “perennial”. The assumption by Greuter in Euro+Med (2006+) and in Greuter & Raab-Straube (2008), followed by Dimopoulos & al. (2013: 63), that only L. saxatilis subsp. saxatilis represents the taxon group in Greece is incorrect. Apart from Limnos, L. longirostris occurs and has been mapped as a native plant in Kerkyra (Corfu), Lefkada as well as a few islets (Flora Ionica Working Group 2016+). Therefore, the status indication of the species being “naturalized” in Albania by Talavera & al. (2015: 348) and Talavera & Talavera (2017: 1155) is probably erroneous. The population in Limnos is found in seminatural Trifolion resupinati vegetation and not in a planted pasture. It consists of a few hundred plants and is clearly native.

E. Bergmeier

Tripleurospermum disciforme (C. A. Mey) Sch. Bip.

+ Gr, Tu(E): [Turkey-in-Europe:] Edirne, E sector of Edirne fortress, [Greece:] village of Maraş, 22 Jun 1913, Neichev (SOM 79952; det N. Stojanov). – There are two localities quoted on the label, i.e. the E part of the Edirne fortress, definitely in European Turkey, and the village of Maraş (Marasia) in what is today Greece: Thrace, Nomos of Evros, Eparchia and Dimos of Orestiada, municipality of Trigono, located between the Arda and Maritsa rivers, 4.8 km W of Edirne. The taxon was previously recorded neither for Greece nor for European Turkey (Greuter 2006+). I checked the plant material collected from Maraş/Marasia based on the determination key by Hossain (1975). The capitula are 7 mm broad, disciform, and exhibit large, ovoid-oblong receptacles (vs ovoid in the closely related Tripleurospermum decipiens (Fisch. & C. A. Mey.) Bornm.). In SOM there is also one collection of T. discifome from Anatolia for comparison (Turkey: Kütahya to Taushanli, 30 km from T., 800–900 m, cultivated fields and road verges, 23 Jun 1962, Davis 36125 (SOM 130950 [ex E]). The plant collected from Maraş/Marasia is identical to the one from Turkey [B2] Kütahya (cited by Hossain 1975: 311). Alas, both collections in SOM lack ripe achenes so that the character whether these were coronate or ecoronate could not be observed. The ranges of T. disciforme and T. decipiens overlap in the Edirne area (the latter, collected in Edirne by A. Baytop, has been seen by Hossain 1975: 310). In addition, Kuzmanov (2012) mentioned that this species can be found in damp and swampy places on the Black Sea coast, near the Mandra lake and the village of Kameno, Burgas district, as well as in a second location on the Tundzha hilly plain. The herbarium materials from Kuzmanov's findings were deposited in SO (no. 75593, 82100 and 82101). Until 1913, this part of SE Europe was still under the control of the Ottoman Empire and much traffic on major roads and railways used to pass through this area, facilitating seed transport of ruderals.

D. S. Dimitrov

Willemetia stipitata (Jacq.) Dalla Torre (≡ Calycocorsus stipitatus (Jacq.) Rauschert).

+ Hs(S): Spain: Catalonia, Lleida, Lladorre, Noarre, Pyrenees, Guerossos mire, 42.699031°N, 01.259803°E, 2020–2025 m, acid fens and shallow rills, 28 Jun 2020, Pérez-Haase & Mercadé (BCN 161774). – Willemetia stipitata is a European orophyte, endemic to the territory covered by the Euro+Med PlantBase (Greuter 2006+), chiefly restricted to the Alps, the Bohemian mountains, the Pyrenees, and the Balkans (Bolòs & Vigo 1995). In the Pyrenees, the species is scarce, although locally common at the French eastern side (Department of Pyrénées Orientales) and in Andorra (Proyecto POCTEFA 2021+). Our finding stands for the only population so far known to occur in Spain. We first discovered the species in 2009 and reported it to a regional atlas of biodiversity (Font & Vigo 2010), in which the species was included in the corresponding 10 × 10 km UTM square without additional information on voucher, locality and status of the species. In 2020, we revisited the area and found c. 80 flowering stems and 500–700 ramets. All individuals were scattered in an area of c. 2000 m2. We also sampled many of the nearby mires and did not find any other population of the species. Despite that there are many suitable places around, the species is likely confined to this single mire in Spain. As for its conservation status, following the IUCN (2012) methodology, we consider the species as vulnerable (VU D1+2) in Spain because: (1) the entire population is included in one 1 × 1 km square; (2) it has fewer than 1000 mature individuals; and (3) recolonization from neighbouring French and Andorran populations is possible.

A. Pérez-Haase & A. Mercadé

Fig. 1.

Sedum dasyphyllum subsp. dasyphyllum – A: plant at beginning of anthesis, flowers not fully open; B: detail of flowering stems and inflorescences; C: plant with open flowers; D: herbarium specimen before pressing (Bienvenu, UPA), scale bar = 10 mm. – Greece: Crete, Lefka Ori, near the Gefyrakia spring, 20 Jun 2021 (A), 22 Jun 2021 (B–D), all photographs by J. Bienvenu.

img-z4-1_355.jpg

Crassulaceae

Sedum dasyphyllum L. subsp. dasyphyllumFig. 1.

+ Cr: Greece: Crete (Kriti), regional unit Chania, municipality Chania, municipal unit Keramia, S of Athymolakos, near the Gefyrakia spring, 35°21′56.3″N, 24°02′11.9″E, 1550 m, 22 Jun 2021, Bienvenu (UPA). – Sedum dasyphyllum was recorded from Crete by Sibthorp & Smith (1809: 310) “in rupibus Cretae et montis Parnassi”, but was never subsequently confirmed. Nevertheless, “Cr” was included in the distribution given in Flora europaea (Webb 1964: 361). This record was regarded by Greuter (1974: 154, 157) as a “very doubtful record, almost certainly wrong; should be omitted from Flora europaea”, and accordingly the Cretan area was omitted from the distribution of the species given in the second edition of Flora europaea (Webb & al. 1993: 434) and the Med-Checklist (Greuter & al. 1986: 22). No specimen corresponding to Sibthorp & Smith's Cretan record could be found in the Sibthorpian herbarium at OXF (Department of Plant Sciences 1985–2021). The new Cretan subpopulation was found on 20 Jun 2021 by one of us (J.B.) together with Giorgos Palimetakis (Chania, Crete) in a ravine on the N side of the Lefka Ori massif in W Crete, within 50 m from the Gefyrakia spring at an altitude of 1550 m. At least 30 individuals were found here, in rock crevices with W- to NW-facing aspects. A few days later, a second subpopulation was found at a place that the local people call “Katsifares” (35°22′18.4″N, 24°01′54.5″E), in a doline, also at 1550 m, with a S-facing aspect but more or less shady. One of us (N.T.), on examining photographs, determined the plants as S. dasyphyllum; U. Eggli (Zürich), L. Gallo (Torino), R. Stephenson (Choppington) and J. Thiede (Hamburg) agreed with this determination based on photographs sent. The plants are clearly S. dasyphyllum on account of the following combination of characters: plants perennial, with leafy, non-flowering shoots, shortly glandular pubescent on upper part of flowering stems, upper leaves and abaxially on sepals and petals, otherwise glabrous; leaves opposite, decussate, green to slightly glaucous, reddish mottled (especially older ones), ovoid, adaxially flattened, up to 5 mm long; petals 5, abaxially white with central brown-red stripe surrounded by numerous small, irregular, pink stripes, adaxially pure white; stamens 10, anthers purple-red or brown-red, oblong, c. 0.5 mm long. In being glabrous except for glandular hairs on the upper part of the flowering stems, and in having leaves opposite and decussate, the plants agree with typical S. dasyphyllum (Hart 2002: 327), i.e. S. dasyphyllum subsp. dasyphyllum (Castroviejo & Velayos 1997: 134). However, there is doubt as to whether subspecies can be clearly defined within the species (Stephenson 1994: 133 and pers. comm. 2021; Hart 2003: 53). In Greece, S. dasyphyllum (subsp. dasyphyllum) is now recorded from all floristic regions except the Ionian Islands, Kyklades and East Aegean Islands (Dimopoulos & al. 2020). In the Euro-Mediterranean area it occurs in C and S Europe, NW Africa and Turkey (Marhold 2011+c). The nearest occurrence to Crete is on Mt Oligyrtos in Peloponnisos, S Greece (Hart 2002: 327, map 1279).

N. J. Turland & J. Bienvenu

Fig. 2.

Sedum sediforme – A: plants in vegetative state; B: inflorescence. – Crimea: near Foros; 12 May 2021 (A), 5 Jul 2020 (B), photographs by L. E. Ryff (A) and S. A. Svirin (B).

img-z5-1_355.jpg

Sedum sediforme (Jacq.) Pau (≡ Petrosedum sediforme (Jacq.) Grulich) – Fig. 2.

N Cm: Crimea: prope Sewastopol (culta?), D'Urville (LE) (Byalt 2020); S coast of Crimea, near Foros, Sevastopol–Yalta highway, 44.39°N, 33.78°E, 165 m, roadside, 19 Sep 2018, Ryff (YALT); ibid., 44.40°N, 33.80°E, 165 m, 5 Jul 2020, Yevseyenkov (photo:  https://www.plantarium.ru/page/image/id/663244.html;  https://www.plantarium.ru/page/image/id/663245.html); ibid., 5 Jul 2020, Svirin (photo:  https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/69567420); E outskirts of Foros, 44.40°N, 33.80°E, 60 m, roadside, 12 Jul 2020, Seregin (photo:  https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/69356431, as Petrosedum rupestre (L.) P. V. Heath); above Foros, old abandoned road to Baydarsky pass, 44.39°N, 33.78°E, 180 m, roadside, 12 May 2021, Ryff (YALT); vicinity of Sevastopol, foot of Mount Gasfort, near Sevastopol–Yalta highway, 44.53°N, 33.66°E, 70 m, 11 Jul 2021, Svirin (photo:  https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/86774992); vicinity of Foros, between Sanatornoye and Oliva, near Sevastopol–Yalta highway, 44.41°N, 33.84°E, 210 m, 23 Aug 2021, Kashirina (photo:  https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/92376243). – Sedum sediforme is widespread in the Mediterranean as a native species (throughout S Europe extending to N Africa and W Turkey as well as Syria and Israel); as an alien, it is indicated for Belgium, Corse, Western Sahara, Australia and New Zealand (Jalas 1999; Hart 2003; Marhold 2011+c; Randall 2017; POWO 2021). In nature it grows usually in dry and exposed habitats, on various soils. Sedum sediforme is, together with S. ochroleucum Chaix, the most robust member of Sedum L. ser. Rupestria Berger. The two taxa share the greenish white or very pale yellow flowers, but S. sediforme can be easily distinguished on account of the absence of floral bracts, which are present in S. ochroleucum (Hart 2003), smaller, glabrous sepals (c. 2.5 mm long in S. sediforme vs glandular puberulent and 5–7 mm long in S. ochroleucum) and patent petals throughout anthesis (vs erect in S. ochroleucum; Webb & al. 1993). For Crimea, the species is given in recent floristic summaries (Byalt 2001, 2012, 2020; Yena 2012), but this indication is based on the only herbarium specimen by J. Dumont d'Urville from the vicinity of Sevastopol, probably collected in 1820. However, Dumont d'Urville did not mention S. sediforme in his publication (Dumont d'Urville 1822), apparently because he assumed that it was a cultivated plant. There are no data on records of this species in Crimea in modern international databases (Marhold 2011+c; Bánki & al. 2021; POWO 2021). Nowadays, S. sediforme is cultivated in some parks of the S coast of Crimea, including the Foros park (Spivakovskiy, photo:  https://www.plantarium.ru/page/image/id/537280.html;  https://www.plantarium.ru/page/image/id/537281.html), and sometimes escapes. Its biggest spontaneous population is located c. 1 km above this park, includes several thousand individuals and occupies an area of c. 1 ha along the sides of the Sevastopol–Yalta highway and the old road to the Baydarsky pass abandoned c. 50 years ago. Smaller populations and single plants occur in other localities in the vicinity of Foros and near Sevastopol. Plants are naturalized on roadsides, but, unlike Sedum rupestre L. s.l. (including S. reflexum L.), which also actively colonizes roadsides in S Crimea, S. sediforme is not spreading into the surrounding natural biotopes. Nevertheless, we believe that it could be a potentially invasive species in the future.

V. V. Byalt, L. E. Ryff & S. A. Svirin

Cyperaceae

Carex tricolor Velen.

+ Se: Serbia: Knjaževac, Crni Vrh, 43°25′26″N, 22°39′34″E, 1950 m, alpine grassland, 21 Sep 2020, Szokala (BRNU). – Carex tricolor is a rhizomatous sedge first described from stony places in the Vitosha mountains in Bulgaria (Velenovský 1890). It was considered a Bulgarian endemic (Jordanov 1964) and has been known, in addition to Vitosha, from the mountains of Rhodopes, Rila and Stara Planina (Assyov & al. 2012). The new site of this species was found in the Serbian part of the Stara Planina, which constitutes its first record in Serbia (cf. Niketić & Tomović 2018) and the first record outside Bulgaria. The plant grows there on a granite bedrock near boulder fields. It forms a large monodominant sward with acidophilous species such as Avenella flexuosa (L.) Drejer, Campanula velebitica Borbás and Sesleria comosa Velen.

D. Szokala

Euphorbiaceae

Acalypha rhomboidea Raf. (≡ Acalypha virginica var. rhomboidea (Raf.) Cooperr.).

N It: Italy: Lazio, Itri municipality, 41°18′16″N, 13°31′59″E, 215 m, inside and in outer parts of nursery garden of Aurunci Mountains Natural Park (where Acalypha rhomboidea is not cultivated), 2 Oct 2018, Perna, (HFLA; det. Di Pietro). – According to the Euro+Med PlantBase (World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2010), the genus Acalypha L. includes two species in the Euro+Med area: A. australis L. and A. virginica L. However, two further species actually occur in Europe: A. ostryifolia Riddel ex J. M. Coult. in Italy (Galasso & al. 2018) and A. rhomboidea Raf. in Portugal (De Almeida & Costa Mato 2006). As part of a project aimed at the revision of the flora and vegetation of the Aurunci Mountains Natural Park, C Italy (see, e.g., Di Pietro & al. 2016), we came across some Acalypha populations that we identified as A. rhomboidea. At present this finding represents the first record of this species for Italy and the second for Europe. Populations of A. rhomboidea in the Aurunci mountains area were recorded for the first time in 2017. Despite various attempts of complete eradication, new populations of the species re-emerged in 2018, 2019 and 2020. At present, we consider A. rhomboidea as a naturalized species in Italy. Acalypha rhomboidea is native to North America and is morphologically similar to A. virginica and A. deamii (Weath.) H. E. Ahles (Levin 2016). Differences with A. virginica include the bracts of the pistillate flowers (sparsely pubescent in A. rhomboidea vs abaxially hirsute in A. virginica), and the number of lobes of the bracts ([5–]7–9[–11] in A. rhomboidea vs [8–]10–14[–16] in A. virginica). Compared with A. deamii, A. rhomboidea exhibits a 3-carpellate pistil (vs 2-carpellate) and seeds (1.2–)1.5–1.7(–2) mm in diam. (vs 2.4–3.2 mm in diam.).

R. Di Pietro, M. R. Perna & D. Iamonico

Gramineae (Poaceae)

Eragrostis virescens J. Presl (≡ Eragrostis mexicana subsp. virescens (J. Presl) S. D. Koch & Sanchez Vega). A Cm: Crimea: Yalta vicinity, Nikita, Nikitsky Botanical Garden, Upper Park, 44°30′41″N, 34°13′56″E, 150 m, as a weed in flower bed under regular watering with planting of chrysanthemums, 19 Jul 2021, Ryff (YALT). – Eragrostis virescens is native to South America (Martini & Scholz 1998; Peterson & Sánchez Vega 2007; Peterson & Giraldo-Cañas 2008) and, according to some sources, SW North America (Peterson 2003; POWO 2021). As an alien it has been recorded in all continents except Antarctica: in the E part of North America, almost all countries of S, W and particularly C and N Europe, S and E Africa, some countries in Asia (Japan, Jordan, Myanmar, Tajikistan) and in Australia (Valdés & Scholz 2009+; Randall 2017; POWO 2021). In E Europe, the only record is known from Udmurtia, Russian Federaton (Tzvelev & Probatova 2019). Compared to other Eragrostis species that are found in Crimea, E. virescens is taller (more than 1 m tall), has stems branching above the base and has a very spreading panicle. In addition, it differs from E. cilianensis (All.) Janch., E. minor Host and E. suaveolens Claus by the absence of crateriform glands on the margin of the leaf blades and on the other parts of the plant, and from the last species also by the absence of smell, and from E. pilosa (L.) P. Beauv. by subequal (not unequal) glumes and seeds with a distinctly striate and reticulate surface and a shallow depression (groove) on the ventral side (more details in Martini & Scholz 1998; Peterson 2003; Peterson & Sánchez Vega 2007; Peterson & Giraldo-Cañas 2008; Tzvelev & Probatova 2019). In the Nikitsky Botanical Garden, E. virescens is a casual alien occurring in the same site as the previously discovered Oxalis latifolia Kunth (Ryff 2021). In 2021, its population occupied about 100 m2 and included about 1000 individuals. Eragrostis virescens dominates with high abundance in Chenopodietea weed plant communities together with Amaranthus retroflexus L., Capsella bursa-pastoris (L.) Medik., Chenopodium album L. s.l., Digitaria sanguinalis (L.) Scop., Oxalis latifolia, and species of Setaria P. Beauv.

L. E. Ryff

Fig. 3.

Saccharum spontaneum – Greece: North Aegean, Limnos (Lemnos) island, Kotsinas, plant c. 2.2 m tall, 9 Oct 2016, photograph by J. Krause.

img-z7-1_355.jpg

Saccharum spontaneum L. – Fig. 3.

+ Gr: Greece: North Aegean, Limnos (Lemnos) island, Kotsinas, 0.5 km SE of Maroula monument, 39°56′20″N, 25°17′25.5″E, 2 m, sandy places at edge of river mouth, 9 Oct 2016, Krause & Ristow (herb. Ristow); 0.7 km NNW of Agia Sofia, 39°50′15.3″N, 25°19′31.2″E, 60 m, roadside, 12 Oct 2016, Krause & Ristow (herb. Ristow); 1.4 km W of S end of Asprolimni, 39°54′42.3″N, 25°21′37.6″E, 3 m, along sandy coastal road, 4 May 2018, Krause & Ristow (herb. Ristow); Asprolimni, 39°54.96′N, 25°22.76′E, 1 m, saltmarsh, 13 May 2021, Bergmeier (obs.). The species has a mainly subtropical distribution, reaching the Mediterranean region in Sicily, N Africa, Cyprus, and the Near East. There are few Greek records: it is given as doubtfully native from Kriti (Damanakis & Scholz 1990), as well as from Kos and W Peloponnisos (Strid 2016, in small print without a map). On Limnos, the species grows in at least three populations, each more than 100 m2, partly near the sea on sandy soils. All populations are surely established and may have been introduced already in historical times. Though slightly ruderal, the sites are not under direct recent human influence. Despite (or because?) of its size, up to 2.5 m tall, it has been overlooked, also due to its flowering time in summer. The status of the species in the E Mediterranean is unclear. It has been classified as native (or long-term naturalized) by Valdés & Scholz (2009+) in N Africa, SW Asia and Sicily, and its status in the Aegean may be the same. Hand (2004) mentioned five findings for Cyprus from roadsides, riverbeds and coastal dunes and concluded, “a relatively recent introduction cannot be excluded”.

M. Ristow, J. Krause & E. Bergmeier

Leguminosae (Fabaceae)

Trifolium angulatum Waldst. & Kit. – Fig. 4.

+ Cm: Crimea: Lenino district, Karalary nature park, Sernaya river, 45°28′00″N, 36°11′34″E, c. 10 m, salt meadow, 4 May 2019, Svirin (PHEO 12179; as Amoria repens (L.) C. Presl, rev. Fateryga 2021); ibid., 6 May 2021, Fateryga & Svirin (MW, PHEO, YALT); ibid., 14 May 2021, Svirin (CSAU, LE, MW, PHEO, YALT). – Trifolium angulatum was hitherto known as native to former Czechoslovakia, Hungary, former Yugoslavia, Romania, Ukraine, Russia (N Caucasus) and Georgia, as well as introduced to France (Roskov 2005). Because this species was already known from the Black Sea coast of Ukraine (Kherson province) and the Sea of Azov coast of Russia (Krasnodar territory) (Bobrov 1987), its record in neighbouring Crimea is not surprising. The new locality discovered here represents a typical habitat of T. angulatum, i.e. a moist coastal meadow with the predominance of salt-tolerant plant species.

V. V. Fateryga, S. A. Svirin & A. V. Fateryga

Trifolium pachycalyx Zohary – Fig. 5.

+ Gr: Greece: North Aegean, Limnos (Lemnos) island, Diapori, 39°51.4′N, 25°10.4′E, 0–1 m, seasonally wet coastal grassland, sheep pasture, sandy ground, 15 May 2021, Bergmeier 21-202 (herb. Bergmeier); ibid., 1.5 km NW of Roussopouli, 39°53.49′N, 25°17.51′E, 50 m, semi-wet wayside between fields, 26 Apr 2018, Krause & Ristow 341/18 (herb. Ristow). – Trifolium pachycalyx is a small, procumbent annual resembling T. suffocatum L. but differs in being caulescent, with sessile axillary heads not congested at the base of the plant, and in its calyx teeth being shorter than the tube. Superficially similar are also T. glomeratum L., with which it co-occurs, and the W Mediterranean T. cernuum Brot., the latter with stalked heads. Trifolium pachycalyx is easily overlooked and the small Limnos population appears to be the first reported since the original description by Zohary in 1969 (illustrations in Zohary 1970: 399 and Zohary & Heller 1984: 251) based on historical collections in NW Turkey, on both sides of the Bosporus, in 1892 by Aznavour and in 1938 by Post. The species has been neglected in Euro+Med (2006+). The new finding makes T. pachycalyx an endemic of the NE Aegean-NW Turkish region (Balkan-Anatolian chorological category “BA” as adopted in Dimopoulos & al. 2013: 24). The extant total area and population size are unknown and the species has been red-listed as “Data Deficient” by the IUCN (Bilz 2011). The vegetation with T. pachycalyx in Limnos represents the Trifolion resupinati (Raus 1983).

E. Bergmeier, J. Krause & M. Ristow

Nyctaginaceae

Mirabilis jalapa L.

A Gg(G): Georgia: Kakheti Region, Sighnaghi, 9 Aprili Street in historical centre of town, 41°37′03″N, 45°55′27″E, c. 760 m, five plants, 21 Sep 2021, Novák (photo [ Fig. S2 (wi.51.51304_Suppl_Fig_S1+S2.pdf), see Supplemental content online]). – Mirabilis jalapa is an ornamental plant of American origin that is commonly cultivated in gardens in Georgia. In the town of Sighnaghi, it was recorded as an occasionally escaping species. It was observed in the trampled vegetation (class Digitario sanguinalis-Eragrostietea minoris), where it preferred less disturbed places, accompanied by Eleusine indica (L.) Gaertn., Eragrostis minor Host, Euphorbia maculata L., E. nutans Lag. and Setaria pumila (Poir.) Roem. & Schult. The species is reported here for the whole South Caucasus for the first time (cf. Uotila 2011+).

P. Novák

Fig. 4.

Trifolium angulatum – Stem with inflorescences. – Crimea: Lenino district, Karalary nature park, Sernaya river, 14 May 2021, photograph by S. A. Svirin.

img-z8-3_355.jpg

Fig. 5.

Trifolium pachycalyx – Stem with inflorescences (green calyces and small, pinkish corollas); mixed with T. campestre Schreb. (conspicuous, yellow corollas). – Greece: North Aegean, Limnos (Lemnos) island, 1.5 km NW of Roussopouli, semi-wet wayside between fields, 26 Apr 2018, photograph by J. Krause.

img-z8-14_355.jpg

Fig. 6.

Orobanche kurdica – Plant in flower, parasitizing Cachrys microcarpos. – Russia: Dagestan, Levashi district, vicinity of Tsudakhar, 20 Jun 2021, photograph by A. V. Fateryga.

img-z9-1_355.jpg

Onagraceae

Epilobium alpestre (Jacq.) Krock.

+ Gr: NC Greece: West Macedonia, Nomos of Florina, Mt Varnous, 40°49′16.18″N, 21°15′13.7″E, 1783 m, along a stream, with Cirsium appendiculatum Griseb., Doronicum austriacum Jacq. and Geum coccineum Sm., 5 Jul 2019, Giannakis (TAUF). – Epilobium alpestre can be easily distinguished from other species of the genus by its verticillate leaves and its entire stigma. The main distribution of E. alpestre is confined to the mountains of C and S Europe, from the Pyrenees to the Caucasus, at elevations of 800–2500 m (Raven 1968; Chamberlain & Raven 1972; Raab-Straube 2018+). Some individuals were found along a rivulet, at subalpine elevation. It has not been reported for Greece in the previously published checklists (Dimopoulos & al. 2013, 2016, 2020).

Th. Giannakis, S. Tsiftsis, E. Eleftheriadou & K. Theodoropoulos

Orobanchaceae

Orobanche kurdica Boiss. & Hausskn. – Fig. 6.

+ Rf(CS): Russia: Dagestan, Levashi district, vicinity of Tsudakhar, 42°20′15″N, 47°10′10″E, c. 1300 m, calcareous slope, 11 Jun 2019, Okatov (photo:  https://www.plantarium.ru/page/image/id/616432.html, as Orobanche sp., rev. Piwowarczyk 6 Jul 2021); ibid., c. 1240 m, calcareous slope, parasitic on Cachrys microcarpos M. Bieb. (root attachment verified), 20 Jun 2021, Fateryga & Svirin (MW, PHEO, YALT). – This species was previously reported from Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Iran, Iraq, Turkey and Turkmenistan (Beck 1930; Novopokrovsky & Tzvelev 1958; Sánchez Pedraja & al. 2005+; Domina & Raab-Straube 2010+; Piwowarczyk & al. 2019). This is the first record of O. kurdica from the North Caucasus as well as from Russia and, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first mention of C. microcarpos as a host for this species. The reports of O. kurdica from Georgia and Abkhazia in the Euro+Med PlantBase (Domina & Raab-Straube 2010+) require confirmation; they were based on Mtzchvetadze (1999), who reported this species parasitizing plants in the genera Cirsium Mill., Tanacetum L. (Compositae), Phlomis L. and Salvia L. (Labiatae). That author apparently took those host plants from Boissier's (1879: 505) original description, although they were not subsequently confirmed and O. kurdica is currently known to be restricted in its hosts to Umbelliferae, usually the genus Prangos Lindl. (Sánchez Pedraja & al. 2005+; Piwowarczyk & al. 2019). The report of this species from Turkmenistan (as “mountainous Turkmenia”), as O. rosea by Novopokrovsky & Tzvelev (1958), is also unconfirmed (Sánchez Pedraja & al. 2005+). The new record from Russia was made in the middle-mountain belt, on a rocky slope covered with phrygana vegetation. Such a habitat is typical of O. kurdica (Piwowarczyk & al. 2019). Orobanche kurdica is morphologically most similar to O. centaurina Bertol. (= O. kochii F. W. Schultz) but differs clearly from it in both morphology (Piwowarczyk & al. 2019) and genetic sequences (Piwowarczyk & al. 2021). The latter species is also distinct from O. kurdica in its hosts (Compositae, usually Centaurea L. s.l. and Echinops L.), and its presence in the Caucasus is questionable (Sánchez Pedraja & al. 2005+).

A. V. Fateryga, R. Piwowarczyk, S. A. Svirin & Ó. Sánchez Pedraja

Phelipanche gussoneana (Lojac.) Domina & al.

+ Cr: Greece: Kriti (Crete), district Rethymno, c. 7 km NNE of Spili, Patsos gorge, 35°15′17″N, 24°34′12″E, c. 300 m, under old Platanus orientalis L. trees, near the Patsos stream, in humid and shaded conditions, with Orobanche hederae Duby, 25 Aug 2021, Rätzel & Rätzel (herb Rätzel; typical plants = var. gussoneana, collected dry, host unknown).

+ Tu(A): Turkey: 20 km W of Trabzon, mountain slope, on Plantago sp., 8 May 1970, Horreüs de Haas 171 (L.2816621; det. Uhlich 12 Jul 2021).

New for Crete and Turkey. For identification, more details and chorology, see Foley (2008), Rätzel & al. (2017a,2017b, 2018, 2020) and Uhlich & Rätzel (2021).

H. Uhlich & S. Rätzel

Rhinanthus rumelicus Velen.

+ Mk: North Macedonia: Mazedonien, Galičani bei Prilep, 2 Aug 1923, Vandas (B; as “Alectorolophus pubescens”; det. Raus). – Marhold (2011+b) did not record the species for “Mk” but did give it for adjacent Albania, Bulgaria, Greece and Serbia. The revised plants exhibit triangular corolla teeth longer than wide, as illustrated by Raus (1991: fig. 21, 2). The locality of Galichani [= Galičani] is a village in the plain of Prilep, georeferenced in Google Earth as 41°18′18″N, 21°28′41″E, at an altitude of 619 m. The record of Rhinanthus pubescens (Sterneck) Soó for “Ma” (= Macedonia sensu Hayek 1928–1931: 185, under Alectorolophus pubescens (Boiss. & Orph.) Sterneck subsp. pubescens) may refer to the cited collection. Rhinanthus pubescens is in fact absent from North Macedonia but endemic to Greece, confined to cliffs and rock ledges at (1400–)1800–2400 m (see Raus 1991: 254, followed by Marhold 2011+b).

Th. Raus

Rubiaceae

Galium uliginosum L.

+ Gr: Greece: E Macedonia, Nomos and Eparchia of Drama, Dimos of Nevrokopi, W Rhodopi mts, c. 13 km N of Potami village, Baklavas area, 41°30′15″N, 24°08′15″E, 1280 m, damp meadow, 6 Aug 2000, Eleftheriadou & Theodoropoulos (TAUF). – New to Greece. Not mentioned by Dimopoulos & al. (2013, 2016, 2020). The species is recorded for the Balkan Peninsula in the area of Thrace by Hayek (1928–1931: 469, “Thra”), but this may refer to the Bulgarian part of that territory where the species is actually known to occur (Assyov & al. 2012: 206). Galium uliginosum is a Euro-Siberian element extending eastward to E Siberia (Yakutskiya) and NW China (Xinjiang). Furthermore, it occurs in Morocco and Turkey. In Europe it is quite widespread but absent from the W Balkans and many of the Mediterranean islands (POWO 2021).

Ch. Charalampidou, E. Eleftheriadou & K. Theodoropoulos

Solanaceae

Datura wrightii Regel

A Gr: Greece, North Aegean: Limnos (Lemnos) island, Myrina, N foot of fortress hill, 39°52.6′N, 25°3.5′E, 20 m, debris, ruderal, in semi-shade, 28 Sep 2020, Bergmeier 20-71 (herb. Bergmeier). – Datura wrightii is a neophyte in the Mediterranean, recently reported to occur in, e.g., Spain (Verloove 2008), France (Tison & Foucault 2014), Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina (Maslo & Verloove 2020). In Greece, as elsewhere, it may have been confused with D. inoxia Mill., which has erect, glandular hairs (vs short, curved, eglandular hairs in D. wrightii) and smaller corollas. Records of D. inoxia in Greece and the Aegean should be critically re-examined.

E. Bergmeier

Umbelliferae (Apiaceae)

Bupleurum euboeum Beauverd & Topali

+ Mk: North Macedonia: Ovče Pole, in pasture, 21 Jul 1962, Micevski (MKNH 065438–065441; as Bupleurum tenuissimum subsp. gracile (M. Bieb.) H. Wolff); ibid., Ovče Pole, on saline soils, 10 Sep 1976, Micevski (MKNH 065436, 065437; as B. tenuissimum subsp. gracile). – This is the first record of the taxon from North Macedonia. Bupleurum euboeum is a little-known species in the Balkans. It became more recognizable after the monograph on European annuals of Bupleurum by Snogerup & Snogerup (2001). They indicated the species only for Greece and Bulgaria. In the Flora of North Macedonia (Micevski 2005), as well as in the Flora of Bulgaria (Assenov 1982), the name B. tenuissimum subsp. gracile was misapplied to B. euboeum. In fact, B. tenuissimum subsp. gracile is a homotypic synonym of B. marschallianum C. A. Mey (≡ B. gracile (M. Bieb.) DC., nom. illeg., non B. gracile d'Urv.). Bupleurum marschallianum occurs in Crimea, SW Russia and South Caucasus and is quite different from B. euboeum described from S Greece. On the other hand, B. euboeum is confused with B. tenuissimum L. because both species have papilla-like structures on their mericarp surface and are halophytes that often grow together in saline habitats. Bupleurum euboeum is distinguishable by its ± equal rays (vs rays clearly unequal in B. tenuissimum), inconspicuous mericarp ridges (vs mericarps with pronounced ± winged ridges), uniformly whitish, warty projections on the mericarps (vs mericarps with yellowish, irregularly rugulose projections) and styles 0.4–0.5 mm long, almost equalling the mericarp width (vs styles to 0.2 mm long, shorter than the mericarp width).

S. Stoyanov & R. Ćušterevska

Bupleurum gerardi All.

– Mk: North Macedonia: According to Snogerup & Snogerup (2001), this species is not found in the territory of North Macedonia, but later it was included in the recent flora of that country (Micevski 2005). The review of Bupleurum specimens kept in the National Herbarium of North Macedonia (MKNH) revealed that it is necessary to exclude B. gerardi from the North Macedonian flora, because all known herbarium records are in fact referable to B. commutatum Boiss. & Balansa (revised specimens: Prespa, along the road toward Lubojno village, 31 Jul 1991, Micevski, MKNH 065389–065392, 065395; Titov Veles, Gorno Vranovci village, on siliceous rocks, 15 Jul 1994, Micevski, MKNH 065393, 065394, 065396, 065397; Štip, in hill pastures, 29 Jun 1976, Miladinova, MKNH 065398, 065400–065402; between the villages of Pčinja and Rajko Žinzifov, 5 Jun 1951, Micevski, MKNH 065403; Pčinja River gorge, Katlanovska Banja village, 15 Sep 1955, Micevski, MKNH 065399). Comparison of the diagnostic characters of B. commutatum and its closely related species B. gerardi and B. aequiradiatum (H. Wolff) Snogerup & B. Snogerup has been recently presented and commented on by Stoyanov (2020).

S. Stoyanov & R. Ćušterevska

Acknowledgements

The work of V. V. and A. V. Fateryga was a part of the State research project no. 121032300023-7 of the A. O. Kovalevsky Institute of Biology of the Southern Seas of the Russian Academy of Sciences. S. Stoyanov & R. Ćušterevska gratefully acknowledge the support to their research on Bupleurum granted by the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences within the Erasmus+ Program. N. J. Turland thanks U. Eggli (Zürich), L. Gallo (Torino), R. Stephenson (Choppington) and J. Thiede (Hamburg) for confirming the identity of Sedum dasyphyllum in photographs sent. Two anonymous reviewers are thanked for their comments on earlier versions of these Notulae.

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Appendices

Supplemental content online

See  https://doi.org/10.3372/wi.51.51304

Supplementary figures. –  Fig. S1. (wi.51.51304_Suppl_Fig_S1+S2.pdf) Nerium oleander L. –  Fig. S2. (wi.51.51304_Suppl_Fig_S1+S2.pdf) Mirabilis jalapa L.

© 2021 The Authors ·
Eckhard von Raab-Straube and Thomas Raus "Euro+Med-Checklist Notulae, 14," Willdenowia 51(3), 355-369, (30 November 2021). https://doi.org/10.3372/wi.51.51304
Received: 4 April 2021; Accepted: 23 November 2021; Published: 30 November 2021
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