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1 December 2018 Daily and Seasonal Prevalence of the Blow Fly Chrysomya Rufifacies (Diptera: Calliphoridae) as Revealed by Semiautomatic Trap Collections in Suburban Chiang Mai Province, Northern Thailand
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Abstract

Effective control of Chrysomya rufifacies (Macquart) (Diptera: Calliphoridae), a blow fly species of medical and forensic importance, requires information on seasonal prevalence and bionomics. Therefore, daily and seasonal activity patterns of C. rufifacies were studied in 3 locations representing different microhabitats (palm plantation, forested area, longan orchard) in a suburban area of Chiang Mai Province, northern Thailand. Investigations were conducted hourly for 24 h using a semi-automatic trap baited with 1–d-old beef offal (300 g). Collections were carried out twice per mo from Jul 2013 to Jun 2014. A total of 55,966 adult C. rufifacies were collected, with 52.4% of individuals trapped in the forested area. Chrysomya rufifacies was present in collections throughout the yr with peak abundance in summer. This species was active during the d with peak activity in late afternoon (3:00 to 6:00 PM). Fly abundance in traps was positively correlated with temperature (r = 0.391; P < 0.001) but negatively correlated with relative humidity (r = −0.388; P < 0.001). Female flies were more abundant in collections (0.26 male per female sex ratio), with 80% of individuals being nongravid. The baseline information provided by our study suggests that C. rufifacies is well-adapted to variable climatic conditions present in northern Thailand, specifically suburban Chiang Mai Province.

Tunwadee Klong–klaew, Narin Sontigun, Sangob Sanit, Chutharat Samerjai, Kom Sukontason, Philip G. Koehler, Roberto M. Pereira, Theeraphap Chareonviriyaphap, Hiromu Kurahashi, and Kabkaew L. Sukontason "Daily and Seasonal Prevalence of the Blow Fly Chrysomya Rufifacies (Diptera: Calliphoridae) as Revealed by Semiautomatic Trap Collections in Suburban Chiang Mai Province, Northern Thailand," Florida Entomologist 101(4), 617-622, (1 December 2018). https://doi.org/10.1653/024.101.0424
Published: 1 December 2018
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