Translator Disclaimer
1 October 1984 TICKS ON WHITE-TAILED DEER FAWNS FROM SOUTHERN ILLINOIS
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Seventy-six white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus (Zimmermann)) fawns captured on Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge in southern Illinois during June–July 1980–1983 were aged and examined for ticks. The prevalence of ticks (Amblyomma americanum (Linnaeus, 1758) and Dermacentor variabilis (Say, 1821)) was 80% intensity of infestation ranged from one to 123 ticks per fawn, averaging 21.6. Tick intensity correlated poorly with age suggesting that there were other, more important determinants of infestation rates. Packed cell volumes in blood of the fawns increased significantly with age, but were not significantly affected by existing tick intensities. Ticks were not directly or indirectly implicated in any of 16 mortalities that occurred among 61 radio-collared fawns monitored for approximately 6 mo post-partum, and were not considered a serious health problem for fawns on the study area.

Thomas A. Nelson, Karen Y. Grubb, and Alan Woolf "TICKS ON WHITE-TAILED DEER FAWNS FROM SOUTHERN ILLINOIS," Journal of Wildlife Diseases 20(4), 300-302, (1 October 1984). https://doi.org/10.7589/0090-3558-20.4.300
Received: 14 February 1984; Published: 1 October 1984
JOURNAL ARTICLE
3 PAGES


SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
Back to Top