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1 January 1973 MORTALITY IN CAPTIVE BIGHORN SHEEP — CLINICAL, HEMATOLOGICAL, AND PATHOLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS
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Abstract

The onset and course of disease in a captive herd of Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) were studied. Major clinical signs were diarrhea, persistent coughs, mucopurulent nasal discharges, loss of weight, poor pelage appearance, and delayed pelage shedding. Primary pathological findings in 16 of 17 deaths were related to pneumonia. Mycoplasma arginini, Pasteurella sp., and Streptococcus sp. were isolated and considered probable etiologic agents. Parasites were not considered to be a primary cause of the clinical signs or the lung disease observed. Hematological changes indicated the chronicity of the disease and had prognostic and limited diagnostic value. Amyloidosis was observed in seven animals, suggesting a high susceptibility of the bighorn to secondary amyloidosis.

WOOLF and KRADEL: MORTALITY IN CAPTIVE BIGHORN SHEEP — CLINICAL, HEMATOLOGICAL, AND PATHOLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS
ALAN WOOLF and DAVID C. KRADEL "MORTALITY IN CAPTIVE BIGHORN SHEEP — CLINICAL, HEMATOLOGICAL, AND PATHOLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS," Journal of Wildlife Diseases 9(1), 12-17, (1 January 1973). https://doi.org/10.7589/0090-3558-9.1.12
Received: 24 April 1972; Published: 1 January 1973
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