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1 June 2013 Description of Anteon seramense (Hymenoptera: Dryinidae), a New Species from Indonesia
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Abstract

Anteon seramense sp. nov. is described from Seram Island (Indonesia). Seram is an island situated in a transition area between the Oriental and the Australian regions. Anteon seramense can be distinguished from the related Australian species A. giluwense Olmi and A. chelogynoides (Perkins) by the different sculpture of the scutum (granulated in A. seramense, punctate and unsculptured among punctures in A. giluwense and A. chelogynoides) and the different distal apex of the protarsal segment 5 (deeply hollow in A. seramense, not hollow in A. giluwense and A. chelogynoides). Anteon seramense sp. nov. can be distinguished from the related Oriental species A. heppneri Olmi and A. thai Olmi by the different shape of the protarsal segment 5 (basal part slightly longer than distal part in A. seramense, much longer in A. heppneri and A. thai).

Dryinidae (Hymenoptera: Chrysidoidea) are parasitoids of Hemiptera Auchenorrhyncha (Guglielmino & Olmi 1997, 2006, 2007). They are widely distributed in the world. The biology of this small group of wasps is still poorly known (Guglielmino & Bückle 2003, 2010; Guglielmino et al. 2006; Guglielmino &Virla 1998).

Anteon Jurine 1807 is present in all zoogeographical regions. About 422 species have been described from all continents (Xu et al. 2013). The genus was revised by Olmi (1984, 1991), for the Australian region, and by Xu et al. (2013), for the Oriental region. One hundred and forty-eight species of Anteon are known from the Oriental region (Xu et al. 2013) and 75 from the Australian region (unpublished data). The species were studied in the last 20 yr mainly by Olmi (1993, 1998, 2010, 2011), in the Australian region, and Xu et al. (2012a,b, 2013), in the Oriental region. In 2012, we have examined additional specimens of Anteon from Indonesia and have found the new species described herein.

MATERIAL AND METHODS

The descriptions follow the terminology used by Olmi (1984), Olmi & Guglielmino (2010) and Xu et al. (2011, 2013). The measurements reported are relative, except for the total length (head to abdominal tip, without the antennae), which is expressed in millimeters. In the descriptions, POL is the distance between the inner edges of the 2 lateral ocelli; OL is the distance between the inner edges of a lateral ocellus and the median ocellus; OOL is the distance from the outer edge of a lateral ocellus to the compound eye; OPL is the distance from the posterior edge of a lateral ocellus to the occipital carina; and TL is the distance from the posterior edge of an eye to the occipital carina.

The specimen studied in this paper is deposited in the collection of the Natural History Museum of London, UK (BMNH).

Anteon seramense sp. nov. (Fig. 1)

  • Description

  • Holotype female. Fully winged. Length 3.1 mm. Head black, except mandible testaceous and clypeus brown; antenna testaceous; mesosoma black; metasoma brown; legs testaceous. Antenna clavate; antennal segments in following proportions: 13:6:6:6:6:6:6:6:6:9. Head convex, dull, covered with short hairs (dense between antennal toruli), completely reticulate rugose; frontal line complete; frons with two lateral keels situated around orbits and directed towards antennal toruli; occipital carina complete; POL = 5; OL = 3; OOL = 4; OPL = 6; TL = 5; greatest breadth of posterior ocelli about as long as OL. Pronotum hairy, anteriorly crossed by slight transverse impression, shiny, rugose, except posterior half of posterior surface smooth and unsculptured; pronotal tubercle reaching tegula; posterior surface of pronotum shorter than scutum (9:15). Scutum dull, granulated and with few weak irregular keels.Notauli incomplete, reaching approximately 0.5 × length of scutum. Scutellum shiny, smooth, unsculptured. Metanotum rugose. Propodeum with strong transverse keel between dorsal and posterior surface; dorsal surface dull, reticulate rugose; posterior surface with two complete longitudinal keels, median area almost completely smooth, shiny and unsculptured and lateral areas reticulate rugose. Forewing hyaline, without dark transverse bands; distal part of stigmal vein much shorter than proximal part (3:9). Protarsal segments in following proportions: 9:3:4:5:15. Enlarged claw (Fig. 1) with proximal prominence bearing 1 long bristle. Segment 5 of protarsus (Fig. 1) with inner side almost rectilinear, basal part slightly longer than distal part (8:7), with one row of approximately 15 lamellae; distal apex with deep furrow evident in ventral view (this furrow contains the distal apex of the enlarged claw when the chela is closed) and about 5 lamellae. Tibial spurs 1/1/2.

  • Male

  • Unknown.

  • Material examined:

  • HOLOTYPE: Female, INDONESIA, Maluku Islands, Seram Island, Solea, Uncarya, viii. 1987, Malaise trap, M.C. Day (BMNH).

  • Etymology

  • The specific name derives from Seram Island.

  • Remarks.

  • Seram Island is in a transition area between the Australian and the Oriental regions, so that the new species has to be included in both zoogeographical regions. In the Australian region, Anteon seramense is similar to A. giluwense Olmi, 1984, and A. chelogynoides (Perkins, 1905). The main differences are in the sculpture of the scutum (granulated in A. seramense, punctate and unsculptured among punctures in A. giluwense and A. chelogynoides), the different distal apex of the protarsal segment 5 (deeply hollow in A. seramense, not so hollow in A. giluwense and A. chelogynoides (Figs. 335 and 336 in Olmi 1984)) and the shape of the protarsal segment 5 (basal part slightly longer than distal part in A. seramense, much longer in A. giluwense and A. chelogynoides (Figs. 335 and 336 in Olmi 1984)). In the Oriental region, A. seramense is similar to A. heppneri Olmi, 1992, and A. thai Olmi 1984. The main differences are in the shape of the protarsal segment 5 (basal part slightly longer than distal part in A. seramense, much longer in A. heppneri (Fig. 1 in Olmi 1992) and A. thai (Fig. 261 in Olmi 1984)).

  • Fig. 1.

    Chela of holotype of Anteon seramense sp. nov. Scale bar: 0.10 mm.

    f01_598.jpg

    THE KEY TO THE FEMALES OF THE AUSTRALIAN SPECIES OF ANTEON PUBLISHED BY OLMI (1984) CAN BE MODIFIED TO INCLUDE A. SERAMENSE BY REPLACING COUPLET 3 AS FOLLOWS:

    3. Distal apex of segment 5 of protarsus in ventral view deeply hollowed to receive distal apex of enlarged claw (Fig. 1); basal part of segment 5 of protarsus slightly longer than distal part (Fig. 1); scutum granulated, not punctate A. seramense sp. nov.

    —. Distal apex of segment 5 of protarsus not hollowed (Figs 335, 336 in Olmi 1984); basal part of segment 5 of protarsus much longer than distal part (Figs 335, 336 in Olmi 1984); scutum punctate, unsculptured among punctures 3′

    3′. Posterior surface of propodeum with median area dull, rugose A. giluwense Olmi

    —. Posterior surface of propodeum with median area smooth, shiny, not rugose A. chelogynoides (R. Perkins)

    THE KEY TO THE FEMALES OF THE ORIENTAL SPECIES OF ANTEON PUBLISHED BY XU ET AL. (2013) CAN BE MODIFIED TO INCLUDE A. SERAMENSE BY REPLACING COUPLET 22 AS FOLLOWS:

    22. Scutum strongly punctate and granulated or not among punctures; punctures very wide, similar to areolae 23

    —. Scutum finely punctate, smooth, unsculptured among punctures; rarely with few areolae laterally 24

    23. Segment 5 of protarsus with basal part slightly longer than distal part (Fig. 1) A. seramense sp. nov.

    —. Segment 5 of protarsus with basal part much longer than distal part (Plates 28A, 47C in Xu et al. 2013) 23′

    23′. Scutum strongly punctate, granulated among punctures A. heppneri Olmi

    —. Scutum finely punctate or strongly punctate and with very wide impressions similar to areolae, not granulated among punctures A. thai Olmi

    ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

    Many thanks to Mr. David Norton (The Natural History Museum, London, UK) for the loan of the specimen studied in the present paper.

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    Adalgisa Guglielmino and Massimo Olmi "Description of Anteon seramense (Hymenoptera: Dryinidae), a New Species from Indonesia," Florida Entomologist 96(2), 598-601, (1 June 2013). https://doi.org/10.1653/024.096.0226
    Published: 1 June 2013
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