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1 November 2014 COVER PHOTOGRAPH AND FRONT MATTER: COASTAL SEGMENT NEAR KLEIN SLANGKOP, CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA

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Coastal Segment near Klein Slangkop, Cape Town, South Africa. This section of coast on the Cape Peninsula shows the complexity of coastal classification where multiple geomorphological features occur in geographic association. Shown in the foreground is the seaward slope of a vegetated dune (of the general type Cape Flats Dune Strandveld) decorated with cobbles thrown up by storm waves. A boulder rampart that sits on top of a marine abrasion platform marks the base of the dune. The coast in the center of the photograph is characterized by a large wave-cut rock platform that is surmounted by a perched beach, backed by an eroding dune system. Another boulder rampart is seen in the background as well as a rocky shore along the wave-cut base of the mountain. With several palimpsest features, the coastal classifier is left with a conundrum of whether the coast is classified as a rocky shore (certainly at low tide) or a rocky and sandy shore (at high tide). Whatever the variable perceptions, this predominantly rocky shore offers a wide range of scenic views and touristic opportunities. A word of caution for visitors and surf fishermen is that chacma baboons (Papio ursinus) frequent the shore searching for food and can be quite aggressive if disturbed. The dozen troops on the Peninsula, varying in size from 7 to over 100 individuals, are scattered on the mountains from the Constantiaberg to Cape Point. During low tide they often roam the beaches and rocky flats to feed on sand hoppers and shellfish, a very unique behavior for primates. (Photograph taken 21 April 2014 by Charlie Finkl, Coastal Education & Research Foundation [CERF], Fletcher, North Carolina, USA).

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"COVER PHOTOGRAPH AND FRONT MATTER: COASTAL SEGMENT NEAR KLEIN SLANGKOP, CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA," Journal of Coastal Research 30(6), (1 November 2014). https://doi.org/10.2112/1551-5036-30.6.ii
Published: 1 November 2014
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