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1 April 1986 RABIES IN RODENTS AND LAGOMORPHS IN THE UNITED STATES, 1971–1984: INCREASED CASES IN THE WOODCHUCK (MARMOTA MONAX) IN MID-ATLANTIC STATES
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Abstract

A review of surveillance data on animal rabies from the Centers for Disease Control revealed 104 cases of rabies in rodents and lagomorphs for 1971 through 1984 in the United States; 80% of these were reported between 1980 and 1984. Woodchucks (Marmota monax) accounted for 64% of the cases. Most of the cases of rabies in woodchucks were associated with an epizootic of rabies in raccoons (Procyon lotor) in the mid-Atlantic states. In rabies endemic areas, humans exposed to woodchucks should receive rabies postexposure prophylaxis if the animal is not available for testing. The decision to administer postexposure prophylaxis to humans exposed to other rodents and lagomorphs should take into consideration the epidemiology of rabies in the exposing species.

Fishbein, Belotto, Pacer, Smith, Winkler, Jenkins, and Porter: RABIES IN RODENTS AND LAGOMORPHS IN THE UNITED STATES, 1971–1984: INCREASED CASES IN THE WOODCHUCK (MARMOTA MONAX) IN MID-ATLANTIC STATES
Daniel B. Fishbein, Albino J. Belotto, Richard E. Pacer, Jean S. Smith, William G. Winkler, Suzanne R. Jenkins, and Katharine M. Porter "RABIES IN RODENTS AND LAGOMORPHS IN THE UNITED STATES, 1971–1984: INCREASED CASES IN THE WOODCHUCK (MARMOTA MONAX) IN MID-ATLANTIC STATES," Journal of Wildlife Diseases 22(2), (1 April 1986). https://doi.org/10.7589/0090-3558-22.2.151
Received: 6 September 1985; Published: 1 April 1986
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