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1 January 1988 CONCENTRATIONS OF CONTAMINANTS IN MUSCLE OF THE AMERICAN ALLIGATOR IN FLORIDA
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Abstract

Samples of tail muscle from 32 American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) in Florida were analyzed for contaminant concentrations to provide preliminary information on the potential public health hazard of meat consumption. Detectable levels were found for eight metals; copper, zinc, iron, chromium, mercury, lead, cadmium and arsenic. Mean residue was highest for mercury (geometric mean = 0.61 ppm). DDE, DDD, DDT, dieldrin, heptachlor epoxide, lindane, and PCB's were found. Mean residue concentrations were compared by lake. Alligators appeared to be suitable monitors of environmental pollution. Concentrations of contaminants found in these animals probably pose little threat to public health. However, recommendations must await analysis of larger sample sizes and information on amount and frequency of meat consumption. Alligators killed for human consumption should continue to be monitored for contaminant residues.

Delany, Bell, and Sundlof: CONCENTRATIONS OF CONTAMINANTS IN MUSCLE OF THE AMERICAN ALLIGATOR IN FLORIDA
Michael F. Delany, John U. Bell, and Stephen F. Sundlof "CONCENTRATIONS OF CONTAMINANTS IN MUSCLE OF THE AMERICAN ALLIGATOR IN FLORIDA," Journal of Wildlife Diseases 24(1), 62-66, (1 January 1988). https://doi.org/10.7589/0090-3558-24.1.62
Received: 28 May 1987; Published: 1 January 1988
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