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1 October 1989 WESTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS IN AVIAN POPULATIONS IN NORTH DAKOTA, 1975
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Abstract

The involvement of wild birds in western equine encephalitis (WEE) and St. Louis encephalitis (SLE) virus activity in the Red River valley area of North Dakota (USA) during a WEE epidemic was investigated in August 1975. Free-ranging birds were captured with mist nets and nestlings by hand. Virologic and serologic results indicated that a similar rate of WEE virus activity occurred throughout Richland County and between permanent and summer resident birds. The rate of SLE virus activity in the birds of Richland County was lower than for WEE virus, but the SLE antibody prevalence was greater in rural areas than within urban locations. Seven of the nine WEE virus isolations were from nestling birds of four different species; the remaining two from adults of two different species. Overall prevalence of neutralizing (N) antibody against WEE virus was 5% in nestling and 14% in adult birds but was the opposite for N antibody against SLE virus, 17% in nestling and 5% in adult birds. Differences between the two viruses in the presence and persistence of maternal N antibody or differential mortality in nestling birds may have caused the disparity in antibody prevalences.

McLean, Shriner, Kirk, and Muth: WESTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS IN AVIAN POPULATIONS IN NORTH DAKOTA, 1975
Robert G. McLean, Ronald B. Shriner, Larry J. Kirk, and David J. Muth "WESTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS IN AVIAN POPULATIONS IN NORTH DAKOTA, 1975," Journal of Wildlife Diseases 25(4), 481-489, (1 October 1989). https://doi.org/10.7589/0090-3558-25.4.481
Received: 27 June 1988; Published: 1 October 1989
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