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1 April 1998 VIRAL ANTIBODIES IN COYOTES FROM CALIFORNIA
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Abstract

Prevalence of antibodies against canine parvovirus (CPV), canine distemper virus (CDV), and canine adenovirus type 1 (CAV) were determined among 152 coyotes (Canis latrans) at the Naval Petroleum Reserves (NPRC; California, USA) from 1985 to 1990. Overall prevalence of antibodies to CPV, CDV, and CAV was 66%, 37%, and 68%, respectively Prevalence of CPV and CDV varied significantly among years. Antibody prevalence did not differ between sexes for any disease, but did vary significantly among age classes and was lowest for pups (<1-yr-old). Among pups, antibody prevalence increased with age for all three diseases. Coyotes are a potential source of viral exposure for endangered San Joaquin kit foxes (Vulpes macrotis mutica), but variation in coyote abundance did not appear to influence antibody prevalence among kit foxes.

Cypher, Scrivner, Hammer, and O'Farrell: VIRAL ANTIBODIES IN COYOTES FROM CALIFORNIA
Brian L. Cypher, Jerry H. Scrivner, Kristie L. Hammer, and Thomas P. O'Farrell "VIRAL ANTIBODIES IN COYOTES FROM CALIFORNIA," Journal of Wildlife Diseases 34(2), 259-264, (1 April 1998). https://doi.org/10.7589/0090-3558-34.2.259
Received: 17 March 1994; Published: 1 April 1998
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