Translator Disclaimer
1 April 2005 TOXICITY OF SODIUM CHLORIDE TO HOUSE SPARROWS (PASSER DOMESTICUS)
Trent K. Bollinger, Pierre Mineau, Mark L. Wickstrom
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Sodium chloride (NaCl) is widely used as a deicing agent on roadways. There are numerous anecdotal reports of poisoning of passerine birds by road salt in the United States and Canada, but little is known about the toxicity of NaCl to songbirds. The objectives of this study were to determine the lethal dose range for NaCl in a representative passerine species (house sparrow [Passer domesticus]); to determine the clinical, physiologic, and pathologic effects of sublethal and lethal oral NaCl exposure; and to assess the potential for recovery after exposure to granular salt or highly concentrated salt solutions. The up-and-down method was used in a pilot study to estimate the lethal oral dose of granular NaCl in wild caught house sparrows. The toxicity of highly concentrated NaCl solution also was investigated. This was followed by an acute dose response study in which house sparrows were dosed orally with granular NaCl at 0, 500, 1,500, 2,500, or 3,500 mg/kg. Sparrows were deprived of water for 6 hr postexposure (PE) in an attempt to mimic specific winter conditions. Groups of three birds at each dose were euthanized at 1, 3, 6, and 12 hr PE, and samples were collected for histopathology and brain and plasma electrolyte analyses. Results indicated an approximate mean lethal dose (LD50) of 3,000–3,500 mg/kg in water-deprived birds, which is similar to mammalian values. House sparrows dosed with a concentrated solution of NaCl generally died at doses of 8,000 mg/kg. Clinical signs observed at ≥1,500 mg/kg included rapid onset (<30 min) of depression (indicated by reduced activity and reduced response to visual and auditory stimuli), ataxia, inability to fly or perch, and death in as little as 45 min. Birds that survived for 6 hr usually recovered. Plasma Na concentrations >200 mmol/l were consistently associated with clinical signs. Pathologic lesions consisted of edema and distension of the caudoventral thin muscled region of the gizzard and were observed 1 hr PE in most birds dosed with ≥500 mg/kg. Brain Na concentrations in clinically ill sparrows and those that died of NaCl toxicity ranged from 1,297 to 1,615 (mean=1,450; SD=115) ppm wet weight or 5,603 to 6,958 (mean=6,367; SD=454) ppm dry weight, which differed significantly from control birds. No histologic lesions were observed in brain sections of exposed birds, likely reflecting the acute nature of the exposure. However, fluid accumulation beneath the koilin layer of the gizzard was observed in the majority of birds at high dosage levels. These results indicate that passerines ingesting relatively small numbers of road salt granules or small quantities of highly concentrated NaCl solutions are at risk of sodium poisoning.

Bollinger, Mineau, and Wickstrom: TOXICITY OF SODIUM CHLORIDE TO HOUSE SPARROWS (PASSER DOMESTICUS)
Trent K. Bollinger, Pierre Mineau, and Mark L. Wickstrom "TOXICITY OF SODIUM CHLORIDE TO HOUSE SPARROWS (PASSER DOMESTICUS)," Journal of Wildlife Diseases 41(2), 363-370, (1 April 2005). https://doi.org/10.7589/0090-3558-41.2.363
Received: 14 May 2004; Published: 1 April 2005
JOURNAL ARTICLE
8 PAGES


SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
Back to Top