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16 December 2021 HEALTH ASSESSMENT OF BLACK-AND-WHITE RUFFED LEMURS (VARECIA VARIEGATA) IN RANOMAFANA NATIONAL PARK, MADAGASCAR
Randall E. Junge, Andrea L. Baden
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Abstract

The Anthropocene is a major threat to biodiversity worldwide. Human pressures including climate change and emerging infectious diseases are presenting new challenges to wildlife, requiring vigilance and monitoring of wild populations to ensure their persistence. In order to monitor fluctuations in health, baseline data from long-term studies are required. Clinical laboratory data on 80 black-and-white ruffed lemurs (Varecia variegata), derived from the capture of 98 individuals spanning six field seasons are presented. Serum biochemical profiles showed variation between years that remained within published reference intervals for the species, with the exception of total bilirubin in 2008, and creatine kinase and chloride in 2019. Serum trace minerals and fat-soluble vitamin values also fluctuated between years and are within ranges seen in other lemur species. These results, combined with previously published data on ectoparasite load and population genetic diversity, suggest that the Mangevo ruffed lemur population is healthy and can provide important and valuable baseline data for comparisons moving forward.

Copyright 2021 by American Association of Zoo Veterinarians
Randall E. Junge and Andrea L. Baden "HEALTH ASSESSMENT OF BLACK-AND-WHITE RUFFED LEMURS (VARECIA VARIEGATA) IN RANOMAFANA NATIONAL PARK, MADAGASCAR," Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine 52(4), 1095-1104, (16 December 2021). https://doi.org/10.1638/2020-0163
Accepted: 5 August 2021; Published: 16 December 2021
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