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1 July 2012 Fifty-Third Supplement to the American Ornithologists' Union Check-List of North American Birds
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This is the 12th supplement since publication of the seventh edition of the Check-list of North American Birds (American Ornithologists' Union [AOU] 1998). It summarizes decisions made between 15 April 2011 and 1 May 2012 by the AOU's Committee on Classification and Nomenclature—North and Middle America. The Committee has continued to operate in the manner outlined in the 42nd Supplement (AOU 2000). There have been no changes to committee membership in the past year.

Changes in this supplement include the following: (1) one newly described species (Puffinus bryani) is added to the main list; (2) three species (Puffinus subalaris, Synthliboramphus scrippsi, and Buteo plagiatus) are added to the main list due to splits from species already on the list; (3) two species (Arremon costaricensis and A. atricapillus) are added by being split both from an extralimital taxon (A. torquatus) and from each other; (4) the notes for one species (Basileuterus culicivorus) are changed because of a merger with an extralimital species; (5) 12 genera (Cryptoleucopteryx, Morphnarchus, Pseudastur, Antrostomus, Hydropsalis, Dendroplex, Lepidothrix, Pheugopedius, Thryophilus, Cantorchilus, Artemisiospiza, and Haemorhous) are added as a result of splits from other genera, resulting in changes to 36 scientific names; (6) two genera (Harpyhaliaetus and Stellula) are lost by merger (into Buteogallus and Selasphorus, respectively), and the scientific names of two species (Buteogallus solitarius and Selasphorus calliope) are thereby changed; (7) one scientific name is changed (to Picoides fumigatus) by transfer from one genus to another; (8) minor corrections are made to the citations for six species (Podilymbus podiceps, Anser anser, Melanitta perspicillata, Anthracothorax mango, Seiurus aurocapilla, and Icterus spurius); (9) the endings of the specific names of two taxa (Aramides cajaneus and Porphyrio martinicus) are corrected; (10) the English names of nine largely extralimital species, three on the main list (Pavo cristatus, Accipiter soloensis, and Serinus canaria) and six in the Appendix (Pterodroma solandri, Macronectes giganteus, Oceanites gracilis, Sterna trudeaui, Copsychus saularis, and Lagonosticta rubricata), are changed to conform to global usage, and the English names of two other species (Buteo nitidus and Synthliboramphus hypoleucus) are changed as a result of taxonomic changes; and (11) one species (Pluvialis apricaria) is added to the list of species known to occur in the United States.

New linear sequences are adopted for species in the genera Buteogallus, Antrostomus, Pheugopedius, Thryophilus, Cantorchilus, and Haemorhous, and for genera in the families Trochilidae, Furnariidae, and Troglodytidae. A new subfamily is adopted in the Trochilidae, and the linear position of the genus Pyrrhula is changed. The linear sequence of orders is changed such that Falconiformes and Psittaciformes are moved to a position immediately preceding Passeriformes, reflecting the close relationship among these orders. The family placement of one genus (Paroaria) is changed on the basis of new information on its phylogenetic relationships. The spelling of one family name (Pteroclidae) is modified.

Literature that provides the basis for the Committee's decisions is cited at the end of this supplement, and citations not already in the Literature Cited of the seventh edition (with supplements) become additions to it. An updated list of the bird species known from the AOU Check-list area can be found at  www.aou.org/checklist/north/index.php.

The following changes to the seventh edition (page numbers refer thereto) and its supplements result from the Committee's actions:

pp. xvii–liv. Change the number in the title of the list of species to 2,083. Insert the following names in the proper position as indicated by the text of this supplement:

  • Puffinus subalaris Galapagos Shearwater. (N)

  • Puffinus bryani Bryan's Shearwater. (H, A)

  • Accipiter soloensis Chinese Sparrowhawk. (H, A)

  • Cryptoleucopteryx plumbea Plumbeous Hawk.

  • Buteogallus solitarius Solitary Eagle.

  • Morphnarchus princeps Barred Hawk.

  • Pseudastur albicollis White Hawk.

  • Buteo plagiatus Gray Hawk.

  • Buteo nitidus Gray-lined Hawk.

  • Pavo cristatus Indian Peafowl. (I)

  • Aramides cajaneus Gray-necked Wood-Rail

  • Porphyrio martinicus Purple Gallinule.

  • Synthliboramphus scrippsi Scripps's Murrelet.

  • Synthliboramphus hypoleucus Guadalupe Murrelet.

PTEROCLIDAE

  • Antrostomus carolinensis Chuck-will's-widow.

  • Antrostomus rufus Rufous Nightjar.

  • Antrostomus cubanensis Greater Antillean Nightjar.

  • Antrostomus salvini Tawny-collared Nightjar.

  • Antrostomus badius Yucatan Nightjar.

  • Antrostomus ridgwayi Buff-collared Nightjar.

  • Antrostomus vociferus Eastern Whip-poor-will.

  • Antrostomus saturatus Dusky Nightjar.

  • Antrostomus arizonae Mexican Whip-poor-will.

  • Antrostomus noctitherus Puerto Rican Nightjar.

  • Hydropsalis cayennensis White-tailed Nightjar.

  • Hydropsalis maculicaudus Spot-tailed Nightjar.

Topazinae

  • Selasphorus calliope Calliope Hummingbird.

  • Picoides fumigatus Smoky-brown Woodpecker.

  • Dendroplex picus Straight-billed Woodcreeper.

  • Lepidothrix coronata Blue-crowned Manakin.

  • Pheugopedius spadix Sooty-headed Wren.

  • Pheugopedius atrogularis Black-throated Wren.

  • Pheugopedius rutilus Rufous-breasted Wren.

  • Pheugopedius maculipectus Spot-breasted Wren.

  • Pheugopedius felix Happy Wren.

  • Pheugopedius fasciatoventris Black-bellied Wren.

  • Thryophilus rufalbus Rufous-and-white Wren.

  • Thryophilus sinaloa Sinaloa Wren.

  • Thryophilus pleurostictus Banded Wren.

  • Cantorchilus leucopogon Stripe-throated Wren.

  • Cantorchilus thoracicus Stripe-breasted Wren.

  • Cantorchilus modestus Plain Wren.

  • Cantorchilus nigricapillus Bay Wren.

  • Cantorchilus semibadius Riverside Wren.

  • Cantorchilus leucotis Buff-breasted Wren.

  • Arremon costaricensis Costa Rican Brush-Finch.

  • Arremon atricapillus Black-headed Brush-Finch.

  • Artemisiospiza belli Sage Sparrow.

  • Haemorhous purpureus Purple Finch.

  • Haemorhous cassinii Cassin's Finch.

  • Haemorhous mexicanus House Finch.

  • Serinus canaria Island Canary. (I)

Delete the following names:

  • Accipiter soloensis Gray Frog-Hawk. (H, A)

  • Leucopternis plumbeus Plumbeous Hawk.

  • Leucopternis princeps Barred Hawk.

  • Leucopternis albicollis White Hawk.

  • Harpyhaliaetus solitarius Solitary Eagle.

  • Buteo nitidus Gray Hawk.

  • Pavo cristatus Common Peafowl. (I)

  • Aramides cajanea Gray-necked Wood-Rail.

  • Porphyrio martinica Purple Gallinule.

  • Synthliboramphus hypoleucus Xantu's Murrelet.

PTEROCLIDIDAE

  • Caprimulgus carolinensis Chuck-will's-widow.

  • Caprimulgus rufus Rufous Nightjar.

  • Caprimulgus cubanensis Greater Antillean Nightjar.

  • Caprimulgus salvini Tawny-collared Nightjar.

  • Caprimulgus badius Yucatan Nightjar.

  • Caprimulgus ridgwayi Buff-collared Nightjar.

  • Caprimulgus vociferus Eastern Whip-poor-will.

  • Caprimulgus arizonae Mexican Whip-poor-will.

  • Caprimulgus noctitherus Puerto Rican Nightjar.

  • Caprimulgus saturatus Dusky Nightjar.

  • Caprimulgus cayennensis White-tailed Nightjar.

  • Caprimulgus maculicaudus Spot-tailed Nightjar.

  • Stellula calliope Calliope Hummingbird.

  • Veniliornis fumigatus Smoky-brown Woodpecker.

  • Xiphorhynchus picus Straight-billed Woodcreeper.

  • Pipra coronata Blue-crowned Manakin.

  • Thryothorus spadix Sooty-headed Wren.

  • Thryothorus atrogularis Black-throated Wren.

  • Thryothorus fasciatoventris Black-bellied Wren.

  • Thryothorus nigricapillus Bay Wren.

  • Thryothorus semibadius Riverside Wren.

  • Thryothorus leucopogon Stripe-throated Wren.

  • Thryothorus thoracicus Stripe-breasted Wren.

  • Thryothorus rutilus Rufous-breasted Wren.

  • Thryothorus maculipectus Spot-breasted Wren.

  • Thryothorus rufalbus Rufous-and-white Wren.

  • Thryothorus sinaloa Sinaloa Wren.

  • Thryothorus pleurostictus Banded Wren.

  • Thryothorus felix Happy Wren.

  • Thryothorus leucotis Buff-breasted Wren.

  • Thryothorus modestus Plain Wren.

  • Arremon torquatus Stripe-headed Brush-Finch.

  • Amphispiza belli Sage Sparrow.

  • Carpodacus purpureus Purple Finch.

  • Carpodacus cassinii Cassin's Finch.

  • Carpodacus mexicanus House Finch.

  • Serinus canaria Common Canary. (I)

Move Leucopternis semiplumbeus to follow Pseudastur albicollis . Move species in Buteogallus to follow Cryptoleucopteryx in this order:

  • Buteogallus anthracinus

  • Buteogallus gundlachii

  • Buteogallus meridionalis

  • Buteogallus urubitinga

  • Buteogallus solitarius

Move FALCONIFORMES and PSITTACIFORMES, and their included species, to precede the order PASSERIFORMES.

Change the sequence of subfamilies, genera, and included species in the TROCHILIDAE to:

Topazinae

  • Florisuga

Phaethornithinae

  • Eutoxeres

  • Glaucis

  • Threnetes

  • Phaethornis

Trochilinae

  • Doryfera

  • Colibri

  • Androdon

  • Heliothryx

  • Chrysolampis

  • Anthracothorax

  • Eulampis

  • Discosura

  • Lophornis

  • Haplophaedia

  • Heliodoxa

  • Eugenes

  • Panterpe

  • Heliomaster

  • Lampornis

  • Lamprolaima

  • Calliphlox

  • Doricha

  • Tilmatura

  • Calothorax

  • Archilochus

  • Mellisuga

  • Calypte

  • Atthis

  • Selasphorus

  • Chlorostilbon

  • Cynanthus

  • Cyanophaia

  • Klais

  • Abeillia

  • Orthorhyncus

  • Phaeochroa

  • Campylopterus

  • Eupherusa

  • Elvira

  • Microchera

  • Chalybura

  • Thalurania

  • Amazilia

  • Trochilus

  • Goethalsia

  • Goldmania

  • Lepidopyga

  • Damophila

  • Hylocharis

Change the sequence of subfamilies, genera, and included species in the FURNARIIDAE to:

Sclerurinae

  • Sclerurus

Dendrocolaptinae

  • Sittasomus

  • Deconychura

  • Dendrocincla

  • Glyphorynchus

  • Dendrocolaptes

  • Xiphocolaptes

  • Xiphorhynchus

  • Dendroplex

  • Campylorhamphus

  • Lepidocolaptes

Furnariinae

  • Xenops

  • Pseudocolaptes

  • Lochmias

  • Philydor

  • Anabacerthia

  • Syndactyla

  • Hyloctistes

  • Automolus

  • Thripadectes

  • Premnoplex

  • Margarornis

  • Xenerpestes

  • Cranioleuca

  • Synallaxis

Change the sequence of genera and included species in the TROGLODYTIDAE to:

  • Salpinctes

  • Microcerculus

  • Catherpes

  • Hylorchilus

  • Ferminia

  • Troglodytes

  • Thryorchilus

  • Cistothorus

  • Thryothorus

  • Thryomanes

  • Campylorhynchus

  • Pheugopedius

  • Thryophilus

  • Cantorchilus

  • Uropsila

  • Henicorhina

  • Cyphorhinus

Transfer Paroaria coronata and P. capitata to the family THRAUPIDAE, to precede Conirostrum leucogenys , and delete the asterisks in front of their names.

Move Pyrrhula pyrrhula to a position following Pinicola enucleator .

p. 6. In the citation for Podilymbuspodiceps, change “Catesby, Nat. Hist. Carolina, p. 91, pl. 91” to “Catesby, Nat. Hist. Carolina 1:91, pl. 91” to follow Linnaeus (Wetherbee 1992).

p. 21. Before the account for Puffinus opisthomelas, insert the following new species account:

Puffinus bryani Pyle et al. Bryan's Shearwater.

Puffinus bryani Pyle et al., 2011, Condor 113:525. (Midway Island.)

Habitat.—Pelagic Waters; breeds presumably on islands with soft soil for nest burrows.

Distribution.—Probably breeds on Bonin (Ogasawara) Islands, Japan (Chikara 2011, Horikoshi et al. 2012), and probably ranges at sea in the northern Pacific Ocean. Has been found in a burrow on Midway Island (Pyle and Pyle 2009).

Accidental in the Hawaiian Islands.

Notes.—See comments under P. assimilis.

In the species account for Puffinus assimilis (p. 22), delete reference to the Hawaiian Islands in the Distribution statement, and insert the following at the end of the Notes: Hawaiian records (e.g., AOU 1998) pertain to P. bryani.

p. 21. Puffinus subalaris is treated as a species separate from P. lherminieri. Remove the current species account for P. lherminieri and insert the following new species account:

Puffinus lherminieri Lesson. Audubon's Shearwater.

Puffinus [sic] Lherminieri Lesson, 1839, Rev. Zool. [Paris] 2:102. (ad ripas Antillarum = Straits of Florida.)

Habitat.—Pelagic Waters; nests in rock crevices or under dense vegetation on islands.

Distribution.Breeds in the Caribbean and western Atlantic region on Crab Cay (off Isla Providencia), on Tiger Rock and other nearby islets (off the Caribbean Coast of Bocas del Toro, Panama), on Los Hermanos and Islas Los Roques (off Venezuela), on Bermuda (formerly), in the Bahamas, near Puerto Rico (Mona Island, and Cayo del Agua, off Culebra), in the Virgin Islands, and widely in the Lesser Antilles (from St. Martin south to islets off Tobago); in the eastern Atlantic on the Cape Verde Islands; in the Indian Ocean (islands in the southern Persian Gulf south to the Mascarene, Seychelles, and Maldive groups); and in the Pacific Ocean from the Bonin and Volcano islands south to the Palau, Vanuatu, Samoa, Society, and Tuamotu islands.

Ranges at sea in the western Atlantic from Massachusetts (at least casually, sight reports north to Nova Scotia) south to Florida and throughout the West Indies to the Caribbean coast of Costa Rica and Panama, and in the Gulf of Mexico west (occasionally) to Louisiana and Texas; in the tropical Indian Ocean north to the Persian Gulf, Arabian Sea, and India; and in the tropical Pacific from the general breeding range south to Indonesia, New Guinea, and northern Australia.

Accidental in Ontario (Almonte), Kentucky (Kentucky Lake), and England.

Notes.Puffinus subalaris, formerly considered conspecific with P. lherminieri, is treated as a separate species based on the phylogeny in Austin et al. (2004).

After the species account for Puffinus nativitatis, insert the following new species account:

Puffinus subalaris Ridgway. Galapagos Shearwater.

Puffinus subalaris Ridgway (“Townsend MS”), 1897, Proc. U.S.N.M. 19(1116): 650. (Dalrymple Rock, Chatham Island, Galapagos.)

Habitat.—Pelagic Waters; nests in rock crevices or under dense vegetation on islands.

Distribution.Breeds in the Galapagos Islands (at least Santa Cruz, Española, Champion, and Wolf Islands).

Ranges at sea near shore, commonly north to the coast of Oaxaca, Mexico.

Accidental in Colombia (Chocó); sight reports from northcentral Mexico (Jalisco), mainland Ecuador, and Peru.

Notes.—See P. lherminieri.

p. 58. The “Laughing Goose” of Edwards, Nat. Hist. Birds, currently cited as the basis for the name Anser anser (AOU 1983, 1998; Chesser et al. 2009), is actually Anser albifrons rather than Anser anser. Change the citation for Anser anser to the following, reverting to previous usage (e.g., AOU 1957):Anasa anser Linnaeus, 1758, Syst. Nat. 10,1, p. 123. (in Europa & America maxime boreali = Sweden.)

p. 79. In the citation for Melanitta perspicillata, change “Edwards, Nat. Hist. Birds 2: 155, pl. 155” to “Edwards, Nat. Hist. Birds, p. 155, pl. 155” to follow Linnaeus (Wetherbee 1992).

p. 93. Change the English name for Accipiter soloensis to Chinese Sparrowhawk (as in Rasmussen and Anderton 2005, Robson 2005, and Ferguson-Lees and Christie 2006). Change the Notes to read: Formerly known as Gray Frog-Hawk (e.g., AOU 1998), but name modified to conform to general worldwide usage. Also known as Chinese Goshawk.

p. 96. Recent genetic studies (Amaral et al. 2009; see also Amaral et al. 2006 and Lerner et al. 2008) have shown that Leucopternis is highly polyphyletic. North American representatives of this genus are found in four divergent lineages: plumbeus and princeps form two monotypic lineages, albicollis and the extralimital species occidentalis and polionotus form another lineage, and semiplumbeus and the extralimital species melanops and kuhli form a fourth lineage. The type species of Leucopternis is melanops, so the name Leucopternis stays with the fourth lineage above.

The new genus Cryptoleucopteryx is added for the species plumbeus, which becomes C. plumbea. Insert the following heading in a position following the account for Geranospiza caerulescens:

Genus CRYPTOLEUCOPTERYX Amaral et al.

  • Cryptoleucopteryx Amaral et al., 2009, Mol. Phylo. Evol. 53:713. Type, by original designation, Leucopternis plumbea Salvin.

  • Notes.—Formely considered part of Leucopternis (AOU 1983,1998), but now treated as a separate monotypic genus on the basis of genetic data (Amaral et al. 2006, 2009; Lerner et al. 2008).

  • Change Leucopternis plumbeus Salvin to Cryptoleucopteryx plumbea (Salvin), move the species account to follow the heading, citation, and Notes for Cryptoleucopteryx, and replace the existing Notes with: Formerly placed in the genus Leucopternis. See comments under Cryptoleucopteryx.

  • The genus Morphnarchus is resurrected as a monotypic genus for the species princeps. Insert the following heading in a position following the account for Buteogallus solitarius (see below):

Genus MORPHNARCHUS Ridgway

  • Morphnarchus Ridgway, 1920, Smiths. Misc. Coll. 72(4):2. Type, by original designation, Leucopternis princeps Sclater.

  • Notes.—Formerly merged with Leucopternis (AOU 1983, 1998), but now treated as a separate monotypic genus on the basis of genetic data (Amaral et al. 2006, 2009; Lerner et al. 2008).

  • Change Leucopternis princeps Sclater to Morphnarchus princeps (Sclater), move the species account to follow the heading,citation, and Notes for Morphnarchus, and insert the following at the end of the species account:

  • Notes.—Formerly placed in the genus Leucopternis. See comments under Morphnarchus.

  • The genus Pseudastur is resurrected as a genus for albicollis and the extralimital species occidentalis. Insert the following heading in a position following the account for Parabuteo unicinctus:

Genus PSEUDASTUR Blyth

  • Pseudastur Blyth, 1849 [or 1852], Cat. Bds. Asiat. Soc, p. 24. Type, by monotypy, Falco poecilinotus Temminck = Falco albicollis Latham.

  • Notes.—Formerly merged with Leucopternis (AOU 1983, 1998), but now treated as a separate genus on the basis of genetic data (Amaral et al. 2006, 2009; Lerner et al. 2008).

  • Change Leucopternis albicollis (Latham) to Pseudastur albicollis (Latham), move the species account to follow the heading, citation, and Notes for Pseudastur, and replacethe existing Notes with: Formerly placed in the genus Leucopternis. See comments under Pseudastur.

  • Move Genus LEUCOPTERNIS Kaup and its citation to a position following the account for Pseudastur albicollis, and move the species account for Leucopternis semiplumbeus to follow.

  • p. 97. Buteo plagiatus is treated as a species separate from B. nitidus. Remove the current species account for B. nitidus and insert the following new species accounts:

  • Buteo plagiatus (Schlegel). Gray Hawk.

  • Asturina plagiata Schlegel, 1862, Mus. Hist. Nat. Pays-Bas, Rev. Méthod. Crit. Coll., livr. 1, Asturinae, p.1, note. (Veracruz, Mexico.)

  • Habitat.—Gallery Forest, Tropical Deciduous Forest, Tropical Lowland Evergreen Forest Edge, River-edge Forest (0–1,300 m; Tropical and Subtropical zones).

  • Distribution.Resident from southern Arizona, southern New Mexico (rarely), western (rarely) and southern Texas south through Middle America (including the Bay Islands, off Honduras) to northwestern Costa Rica (Gulf of Nicoya region). Northernmost breeding populations in Arizona, New Mexico, and western Texas are largely migratory southward in nonbreeding season.

  • Notes.—Formerly treated as conspecific with the allopatric B. nitidus under the English name Gray Hawk, but separated on the basis of differences in vocalizations, plumage, and morphology (Millsap et al. 2011). Formerly (AOU 1998) placed in the genus Asturina (with B. nitidus), but mitochondrial DNA sequence data indicate that recognition of the genus Asturina renders Buteo paraphyletic (Riesing et al. 2003).

  • Buteo nitidus (Latham). Gray-lined Hawk.

  • Falco nitidus Latham, 1790, Index Ornithol. 1:41. Based on the “Plumbeous Falcon” Latham, Gen. Synop. Birds (suppl.) 1:37. (in Cayana = Cayenne.)

  • Habitat.— Gallery Forest, Tropical Deciduous Forest, Tropical Lowland Evergreen Forest Edge, River-edge Forest (0–1,600 m; Tropical and Subtropical zones).

  • Distribution.Resident from Costa Rica (except northwest), Panama, Colombia, Venezuela, Tobago, Trinidad, and the Guianas south, west of the Andes to western Ecuador, and east of the Andes to northern Argentina, Paraguay, and southern Brazil.

  • Notes.—See comments under B. plagiatus.

pp. 97–99. Recent genetic data have shown that the linear position of the genus Buteogallus does not properly reflect its evolutionary relationships, that the linear sequence of species within the genus Buteogallus does not reflect their evolutionary relationships, and that the genus is paraphyletic if species currently included in the genus Harpyhaliaetus are excluded (Amaral et al. 2006, 2009; Lerner et al. 2008). Move the genus heading for Buteogallus and the four species accounts to a position following the account for Cryptoleucopteryx plumbea and insert the species accounts in the following sequence:

  • Buteogallus anthracinus

  • Buteogallus gundlachii

  • Buteogallus meridionalis

  • Buteogallus urubitinga

Delete the genus heading for Harpyhaliaetus. Move the citations for Harpyhaliaetus and Urubitornis into the synonymy of Buteogallus. Insert the account for Harpyhaliaetus solitarius following the species account for Buteogallus urubitinga, changing Harpyhaliaetus solitarius (Tschudi) to Buteogallus solitarius (Tschudi), and replace the existing Notes with: Formerly placed in the genus Harpyhaliaetus, but genetic data indicate that Buteogallus is paraphyletic if Harpyhaliaetus is excluded (Amaral et al. 2006,2009).

pp. 105–111. Move the heading Order FALCONIFORMES: Caracaras and Falcons and the family and subfamily headings and genus and species accounts included under this heading to a position following the account for Campephilus imperialis. Insert the following at the beginning of the Notes: Recent phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences have shown that the Falconiformes, Psittaciformes, and Passeriformes form a monophyletic group that may also include the extralimital Cariamiformes (Ericson et al. 2006, Hackett et al. 2008).

p. 118. Change the English name for Pavo cristatus to Indian Peafowl (as in Dickinson 2003, Rasmussen and Anderton 2005, Gill and Wright 2006). At the end of the account for this species, insert the following:

Notes.—Formerly known as Common Peafowl (e.g., AOU 1983, 1998), but name modified to conform to general worldwide usage.

p. 133. Change Aramides cajanea (Müller) to Aramides cajaneus (Müller). David and Gosselin (2011) have shown that the specific name, previously treated as a noun in apposition, is really a geographical adjective based on the place name “Cajenne,” necessitating a change in gender ending.

p. 136. Change Porphyrio martinica (Linnaeus) to Porphyrio martinicus (Linnaeus) and make appropriate corrections in the Notes. David and Gosselin (2011) have shown that the specific name,previously treated as a noun in apposition, is really a geographical adjective based on the place name “Martinique,” necessitating a change in gender ending.

pp. 142–143. Records of the European Golden-Plover, Pluvialis apricaria, in the United States are recognized. Replace the final paragraph in the Distribution statement with the following: Casual in Atlantic Canada and Saint-Pierre et Miquelon, especially in spring after storms. Accidental in southeastern Alaska in winter (specimen, Piston and Heinl 2001) and in fall in Maine (North Amer. Birds 63:44, photo) and Delaware (North Amer. Birds 64:46, photo).

p. 213. Synthliboramphus scrippsi is treated as a species separate from S. hypoleucus. Insert the following new species account before the account for S. hypoleucus:

Synthliboramphus scrippsi (Green and Arnold). Scripps's Murrelet.

Endomychura hypoleuca scrippsi Green and Arnold, 1939, Condor 41:28. (Anacapa Island, California.)

Habitat.— Coastal waters, pelagic waters; nests on islands on the ground, in crevices beneath large rocks, or under dense clumps of vegetation.

Distribution.—Breeds on islands off southern California (San Miguel, Santa Cruz, Anacapa, Santa Barbara, San Clemente, and, formerly, Santa Catalina) and western Baja California (San Benito, and Coronado and San Jeróonimo islands). On large islands (e.g., San Miguel, Santa Cruz, San Clemente) confined largely or entirely to offshore rocks (Drost and Lewis 1995). Breeding on San Martin and Cedros islands, Baja California, uncertain.

Winters offshore from northern California (rarely) south to southern Baja California.

Wanders in late summer and fall north to waters from off central California to Oregon, casually to Washington and southern British Columbia.

Notes.—See comments under S. hypoleucus.

Change the English name of S. hypoleucus to Guadalupe Murrelet and change the Distribution statement to:

Breeds on offshore rocks and islands of western Baja California from Guadalupe Island south to San Benito Islands. Unconfirmed breeding on San Martin Island, Baja California, and San Clemente and Santa Barbara islands, California.

Winters offshore presumably within the breeding range along the Pacific coast of Baja California.

Wanders after the breeding season to waters well offshore of central California (rare and somewhat irregular in late summer and fall), and at least casually north to off the coast of Washington. Casual off coastal California at least until early winter, and accidental there in midwinter. Less numerous than S. scrippsi in inshore waters.

Replace the existing Notes for S. hypoleucus with the following: Formerly treated as conspecific with S. scrippsi (as Xantus's Murrelet) but separated on the basis of a lack of evidence of interbreeding where the two are sympatric on the San Benito Islands, and on differences in morphology (especially facial pattern and bill shape), vocalizations, and genetics (Birt et al. 2012; see also Jehl and Bond 1975, Keitt 2005). These species were formerly placed in the genus Endomychura.

p. 217. Change the heading Family PTEROCLIDIDAE: Sandgrouse to Family PTEROCLIDAE: Sandgrouse. The name Pteroclididae is an unjustified modification of Pteroclidae Bonaparte, 1831 (Bock 1994).

pp. 232–245. Move the heading Order PSITTACIFORMES: Parrots and the family and subfamily headings and genus and species accounts included under this heading to a position following the account for Falco mexicanus. Insert the following at the beginning of the Notes: Recent phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences have shown that the Falconiformes, Psittaciformes, and Passeriformes form a monophyletic group that may also include the extralimital Cariamiformes (Ericson et al. 2006, Hackett et al. 2008). Analysis of retroposons also supports a close relationship between Psittaciformes and Passeriformes (Suh et al. 2011).

pp. 270–273. Phylogenetic analysis of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences (Han et al. 2010) has shown that the genus Caprimulgus is highly polyphyletic and that the linear sequence of species currently placed in this genus does not reflect their evolutionary relationships. Species now in Caprimulgus are found in three of the four major clades of the Caprimulgidae, two endemic to the New World and one consisting of Old World taxa; the type species europaeus belongs to the Old World group, which retains the name Caprimulgus. The AOU Check-list includes species from each of these three clades, including an accidental from the Old World.

The genus Antrostomus, which has been in the synonymy of Caprimulgus, is restored for the species carolinensis, cubanensis, badius, ridgwayi, arizonae, and saturatus, and is now used for the following species also formerly placed in Caprimulgus: rufus, salvini, ridgwayi, vociferus, and noctitherus. Remove the citations for Antrostomus, Annamormis, and Setochalcis from the synonymy of Caprimulgus and insert the following heading and Notes after the account for Nyctiphrynus ocellatus:

Genus ANTROSTOMUS Bonaparte

  • Antrostomus Bonaparte, 1838, Geogr. Comp. List, p. 8. Type, by subsequent designation (G. R. Gray, 1840), Caprimulgus carolinensis Gmelin.

  • Setochalcis Oberholser, 1914, Bull. U.S. Natl. Mus., no. 86, p. 11. Type, by original designation, Caprimulgus vociferus Wilson.

  • Annamormis Davis, 1978, Pan American Studies 1:39. Type, by original designation, Caprimulgus rufus Boddaert.

  • Notes.—Formerly merged with Caprimulgus (AOU 1983, 1998), but now treated as a separate genus on the basis of genetic data (Han et al. 2010).

  • Change the generic names of Caprimulgus carolinensis, Caprimulgus rufus , Caprimulgus cubanensis, Caprimulgus salvini , Caprimulgus badius , Caprimulgus ridgwayi , Caprimulgus vociferus Caprimulgus saturatus , Caprimulgus arizonae , and Caprimulgus noctitherus to Antrostomus and place the accounts for these species in this sequence under the heading and Notes for Antrostomus. Remove the parentheses around the authority names for cubanensis, badius, ridgwayi, and saturatus; add parentheses around the authority names for carolinensis, rufus, salvini, and vociferus; and change the genus name in the citation for A. arizonae from Caprimulgus to Antrostomus. For each species, make the appropriate changes in generic names or abbreviations within the existing Notes, and amend the Notes as detailed below. In the species accounts for all species except A. saturatus, add the following to the end of the Notes: Formerly placed in the genus Caprimulgus. See comments under Antrostomus.

  • Insert the following at the end of the species account for A. saturatus:

  • Notes.—Formerly placed in the genus Caprimulgus. See comments under Antrostomus.

  • Following the species account for Antrostomus noctitherus, insert the following heading:

Genus HYDROPSALIS Wagler

  • Hydropsalis Wagler, 1832, Isis von Oken, col. 1222. Type, by subsequent designation (G. R. Gray, 1855), Caprimulgus furcifer Vieillot.

  • Move the citation for Antiurus from the synonymy of Caprimulgus to the synonymy of Hydropsalis, change Caprimulgus cayennensis Gmelin and Caprimulgus maculicaudus (Lawrence) to Hydropsalis cayennensis (Gmelin) and Hydropsalis maculicaudus (Lawrence), respectively, and place the accounts for these species in this sequence under the heading and Notes for Hydropsalis. For each species, make the appropriate changes in generic names or abbreviations within the existing Notes, and amend the Notes as detailed below. In the species account for H. cayennensis, replace the existing Notes with the following:

  • Notes.—Formerly placed in the genus Caprimulgus (AOU 1983, 1998). This species and H. maculicaudus are now considered to be part of a mostly South American group placed in an expanded Hydropsalis on the basis of genetic data (Han et al. 2010).

  • Insert the following at the end of the species account for H. maculicaudus:

  • Notes.—Formerly placed in the genus Caprimulgus (AOU 1983,1998). See comments under Hydropsalis cayennensis.

  • pp. 282–314. Phylogenetic analysis of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences (McGuire et al. 2007, 2009) has shown that the linear sequence of subfamilies and genera within the family Trochilidae does not accurately reflect their evolutionary relationships.

  • Under the heading Family TROCHILIDAE: Hummingbirds on p. 282, replace the existing Notes with the following: Sequence of subfamilies and genera follows McGuire et al. (2009).

Insert the following heading after the Notes on p. 282 referenced above:

  • Subfamily TOPAZINAE: Topazes

Place the subfamilies and genera in the family Trochilidae in the following new sequence:

  • Subfamily TOPAZINAE: Topazes

  • Florisuga

  • Subfamily PHAETHORNITHINAE: Hermits

  • Eutoxeres

  • Glaucis

  • Threnetes

  • Phaethornis

  • Subfamily TROCHILINAE: Typical Hummingbirds

  • Doryfera

  • Colibri

  • Androdon

  • Heliothryx

  • Chrysolampis

  • Anthracothorax

  • Eulampis

  • Discosura

  • Lophornis

  • Haplophaedia

  • Heliodoxa

  • Eugenes

  • Panterpe

  • Heliomaster

  • Lampornis

  • Lamprolaima

  • Calliphlox

  • Doricha

  • Tilmatura

  • Calothorax

  • Archilochus

  • Mellisuga

  • Calypte

  • Atthis

  • Selasphorus

  • Chlorostilbon

  • Cynanthus

  • Cyanophaia

  • Klais

  • Abeillia

  • Orthorhyncus

  • Phaeochroa

  • Campylopterus

  • Eupherusa

  • Elvira

  • Microchera

  • Chalybura

  • Thalurania

  • Amazilia

  • Trochilus

  • Goethalsia

  • Goldmania

  • Lepidopyga

  • Damophila

  • Hylocharis

p. 288. In the citation for Anthracothorax mango, change “Albin, Nat. Hist. Birds 2:45, pl. 49, fig. 1” to “Albin, Nat. Hist. Birds 3:45, pl. 49, fig. 2” to follow Linnaeus (Wetherbee 1992).

p. 311. Change Stellula calliope (Gould) to Selasphorus calliope (Gould), delete the genus heading for Stellula, move the citation for Stellula into the synonymy of Selasphorus, insert the species account for Selasphorus calliope to follow the account for Selasphorus scintilla, delete “and Stellula” from the Notes under genus Archilochus (p. 309), and insert the following at the end of the species account:

Notes.—Formerly placed in the genus Stellula, but genetic data indicate that Selasphorus is paraphyletic if calliope is excluded (McGuire et al. 2007, 2009).

p. 342. Change Veniliornis fumigatus (d'Orbigny) to Picoides fumigatus (d'Orbigny), move the account for this species to precede the species account for Picoides villosus, and add the following to the end of the species account:

Notes.—Formerly placed in the genus Veniliornis, but genetic data (Moore et al. 2006) indicate that it is a member of the genus Picoides.

pp. 347–360. Phylogenetic analysis of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences (Derryberry et al. 2011) has shown that the linear sequence of subfamilies and genera within the family Furnariidae does not accurately reflect their evolutionary relationships. Their phylogenetic conclusions result in a new sequence of subfamilies and genera, as follows:

  • Subfamily SCLERURINAE: Leaftossers

  • Sclerurus

  • Subfamily DENDROCOLAPTINAE: Woodcreepers

  • Sittasomus

  • Deconychura

  • Dendrocincla

  • Glyphorynchus

  • Dendrocolaptes

  • Xiphocolaptes

  • Xiphorhynchus

  • Dendroplex

  • Campylorhamphus

  • Lepidocolaptes

  • Subfamily FURNARIINAE: Ovenbirds

  • Xenops

  • Pseudocolaptes

  • Lochmias

  • Philydor

  • Anabacerthia

  • Syndactyla

  • Hyloctistes

  • Automolus

  • Thripadectes

  • Premnoplex

  • Margarornis

  • Xenerpestes

  • Cranioleuca

  • Synallaxis

Under the heading Family FURNARIIDAE: Ovenbirds, Woodcreepers, and Leaftossers on p. 347, replace the existing Notes with the following:

Notes.—The woodcreepers (subfamily Dendrocolaptinae) were formerly (AOU 1983,1998) placed in the separate family Dendrocolaptidae, but genetic data (Irestedt et al. 2002, Chesser 2004), which are consistent with morphological studies (Ames 1971, Feduccia 1973), showed that these genera were embedded within the Furnariidae. The sequence of genera follows Derryberry et al. (2011).

On p. 349, delete the Notes under the heading Genus XENERPESTES Berlepsch.

p. 358. The genus Dendroplex is resurrected for Xiphorhynchus picus and the extralimital species X. kienerii. Remove the citation for Dendroplex from the synonymy of Xiphorhynchus and insert the following after the account for Xiphorhynchus erythropygius:

Genus DENDROPLEX Swainson

  • Dendroplex Swainson, 1827, Zool. J. 3: 354. Type, by subsequent designation, D. picus = Oriolus picus Gmelin. (Previously cited type, D. guttatus Spix = Dendrocolaptes ocellatus Spix set aside as misidentification [I.C.Z.N. 1999, Art. 69.2.4], fide Aleixo et al. 2007.)

  • Notes.—Formerly merged with Xiphorhynchus (AOU 1983, 1998), but now treated as a separate genus on the basis of genetic data, which show that the two genera are not closely related (Aleixo 2002). The return to the use of Dendroplex for picus and the extralimital species kienerii (Lafresnaye, 1855) [Zimmer's Woodcreeper] is based on Aleixo et al. (2007), who fixed the type of Dendroplex as picus, invalidating the former designation of Xiphorhynchus ocellatus as the type because it was based on a misidentification.

  • Change Xiphorhynchus picus (Gmelin) to Dendroplexpicus (Gmelin), place the account for these species under the heading and Notes for Dendroplex, and insert the following at the end of the species account:

  • Notes.—Formerly placed in the genus Xiphorhynchus. See comments under Dendroplex.

  • p. 426. The genus Pipra as currently constituted does not form a monophyletic group (Prum 1992, Rêgo et al. 2007, Tello et al. 2009, McKay et al. 2010); a group of species that includes coronata is not closely related to the remaining species of Pipra, including the type species aureola. Delete the Notes under the heading Family PIPRIDAE: Manakins (p. 423), delete “and Pipra coronata” from the Notes for Genus PIPRA Linnaeus, remove the citation for Lepidothrix from the synonymy of Pipra, and insert the following after the species account for Chiroxiphia linearis:

Genus LEPIDOTHRIX Bonaparte

  • Lepidothrix Bonaparte, 1854, Consp. Voluc. Anisod., p. 6. Type, by subsequent designation (G. R. Gray, 1855), Pipra cyanocapilla Wagl. = Pipra cyanocapilla Hahn = Pipra coronata Spix.

  • Notes.—Formerly merged with Pipra (AOU 1983,1998), but now treated as a separate genus on the basis of syringeal (Prum 1992) and genetic data (Rêgo et al. 2007, Tello et al. 2009, McKay et al. 2010), which indicate that the two genera are not closely related.

  • Change Pipra coronata Spix to Lepidothrix coronata (Spix), place the account for this species under the heading and Notes for Lepidothrix, and replace the existing Notes with the following: Groups:L. velutina (Berlepsch, 1883) [Velvety Manakin], L. coronata [Blue-crowned Manakin], and L. exquisita (Hellmayr, 1905) [Exquisite Manakin]. Formerly placed in the genus Pipra. See comments under Lepidothrix.

  • pp. 471–486. Phylogenetic analysis of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences (Rice et al. 1999, Barker 2004, Mann et al. 2006) has shown that the linear sequence of genera within the family Troglodytidae does not accurately reflect their evolutionary relationships. Their phylogenetic conclusions result in a new sequence of genera, as follows:

  • Salpinctes

  • Microcerculus

  • Catherpes

  • Hylorchilus

  • Ferminia

  • Troglodytes

  • Thryorchilus

  • Cistothorus

  • Thryothorus

  • Thryomanes

  • Campylorhynchus

  • Pheugopedius (see below)

  • Thryophilus (see below)

  • Cantorchilus (see below)

  • Uropsila

  • Henicorhina

  • Cyphorhinus

Under the heading Family TROGLODYTIDAE: Wrens on p. 471, add the following sentence at the end of the Notes: Sequence of genera follows Barker (2004) and Mann et al. (2006).

Delete the Notes under the headings Genus SALPINCTES Cabanis, Genus MICROCERCULUS Sclater, Genus CATHERPES Baird, and Genus HYLORCHILUS Nelson.

pp. 475–479. Phylogenetic analysis of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences (Barker 2004, Mann et al. 2006) has shown that the genus Thryothorus is polyphyletic and that the linear sequence of species currently placed in this genus does not reflect their evolutionary relationships. The type species ludovicianus is only distantly related to the other species currently placed in Thryothorus, which constitute three clades that may or may not form a monophyletic group. The AOU Check-list includes species from each of these clades.

Move the genus heading for Thryothorus to follow the species account for Cistothorus palustris, and move the species account for Thryothorus ludovicianus to follow the heading for Thryothorus. Add the following under the citation of genus Thryothorus:

Notes.—See Notes under Pheugopedius, Thryophilus, and Cantorchilus.

Change the second sentence of the Notes for Thryothorus ludovicianus to read: Phillips (1986) treated albinucha as a species.

Following the species account for Campylorhynchus brunneicapillus, insert the following:

Genus PHEUGOPEDIUS Cabanis

  • Pheugopedius Cabanis, 1851, Mus. Hein., 1: 79. Type, by monotypy, Thryothorus genibarbis Swainson.

  • Notes.—Formerly merged with Thryothorus (AOU 1983, 1998), but now treated as separate on the basis of genetic data (Barker 2004, Mann et al. 2006), which indicate that the two genera are not closely related.

  • Change the generic names of Thryothorus spadix , Thryothorus atrogularis , Thryothorus rutilus , Thryothorus maculipectus , Thryothorus felix , and Thryothorus fasciatoventris to Pheugopedius and place the accounts for these species in this sequence under the heading and Notes for Pheugopedius. Remove the parentheses around the authority name for spadix and add parentheses around the authority names for atrogularis, rutilus, maculipectus, felix, and fasciatoventris. For each species, make the appropriate changes in generic names or abbreviations within the existing Notes, and amend the Notes as detailed below. In the species accounts for all species except P. fasciatoventris, add the following to the end of the Notes: Formerly placed in the genus Thryothorus. See comments under Pheugopedius.

  • Delete “; they constitute a superspecies (Sibley and Monroe 1990)” from both the first sentence of the Notes for Pheugopedius spadix and the first sentence of the Notes for Pheugopedius rutilus.

  • Insert the following at the end of the species account for P. fasciatoventris:

  • Notes.—Formerly placed in the genus Thryothorus. See comments under Pheugopedius.

  • Following the species account for Pheugopedius fasciatoventris, insert the following heading and Notes:

Genus THRYOPHILUS Baird

  • Thryophilus Baird, 1864, Rev. Amer. Bds. 1:127. Type, by original designation, Thryothorus rufalbus Lafresnaye.

  • Notes.—Formerly merged with Thryothorus (AOU 1983, 1998), but now treated as separate on the basis of genetic data (Barker 2004, Mann et al. 2006), which indicate that the two genera are not closely related.

  • Change the generic names of Thryothorus rufalbus , Thryothorus sinaloa , and Thryothorus pleurostictus to Thryophilus and place the accounts for these species in this sequence under the heading and Notes for Thryophilus. Add parentheses around the authority names for rufalbus and pleurostictus. For each species, make the appropriate changes in generic names or abbreviations within the existing Notes, and amend the Notes as detailed below. In the species accounts for T. rufalbus and T. sinaloa, add the following to the end of the Notes: Formerly placed in the genus Thryothorus. See comments under Thryophilus.

  • Delete “constitute a superspecies (Sibley and Monroe 1990); they” from the first sentence of the Notes for Thryophilus rufalbus, and delete the second sentence of the Notes for Thryophilus sinaloa.

  • Insert the following at the end of the species account for T. pleurostictus:

  • Notes.—Formerly placed in the genus Thryothorus. See comments under Thryophilus.

  • Following the species account for Thryophilus pleurostictus, insert the following heading and Notes:

Genus CANTORCHILUS Mann et al.

  • Cantorchilus Mann et al., 2006, Mol. Phylo. Evol. 40:758. Type, by original designation, Thryothorus longirostris Vieillot.

  • Notes.—Formerly considered part of Thryothorus (AOU 1983, 1998), but now treated as separate on the basis of genetic data (Barker 2004, Mann et al. 2006), which indicate that the two genera are not closely related.

  • Change the generic names of Thryothorus leucopogon , Thryothorus thoracicus , Thryothorus modestus , Thryothorus nigricapillus , Thryothorus semibadius , and Thryothorus leucotis to Cantorchilus and place the accounts for these species in this sequence under the heading and Notes for Cantorchilus. Add parentheses around the authority names for thoracicus, modestus, nigricapillus, semibadius, and leucotis. For each species, make the appropriate changes in generic names or abbreviations within the existing Notes, and amend the Notes as detailed below. Add the following to the end of the Notes of the species accounts for thoracicus, modestus, nigricapillus, and semibadius: Formerly placed in the genus Thryothorus. See comments under Cantorchilus.

  • Delete the existing Notes for Cantorchilus leucopogon and insert the following:

  • Notes.—Hellmayr (1934) and Paynter in Mayr and Greenway (1960) considered C. leucopogon and C. thoracicus to be conspecific, but see Wetmore et al. (1984). Formerly placed in the genus Thryothorus. See comments under Cantorchilus.

  • Delete the second sentence from the existing Notes for Cantorchilus modestus.

  • Delete the second sentence from the existing Notes for Cantorchilus nigricapillus, and insert the following: Some authors (e.g., Hellmayr 1934 and Paynter in Mayr and Greenway 1960) consider C. nigricapillus and C. semibadius to be conspecific, but see Slud (1964) and Wetmore et al. (1984).

  • Delete the existing Notes for Cantorchilus leucotis and insert the following:

  • Notes.—Species limits among Cantorchilus leucotis and the South American C. superciliaris (Lawrence, 1869) [Superciliated Wren], C. guarayanus (Lafresnaye and d'Orbigny, 1837) [Fawnbreasted Wren], and C. longirostris (Vieillot, 1818) [Long-billed Wren] are uncertain (see Ridgely and Tudor 1989). Formerly placed in the genus Thryothorus. See comments under Cantorchilus.

  • p. 554. In the citation for Seiurus aurocapilla, change “Edwards, Glean. Nat. Hist. 5:91, pl. 252” to “Edwards, Glean. Nat. Hist. 1:91, pl. 252” to correct a numbering error (Wetherbee 1992).

  • p. 565. The extralimital species Basileuterus hypoleucus is merged with Basileuterus culicivorus. Add the following to the end of the Notes for B. culicivorus: Includes B. hypoleucus Bonaparte, 1850 [White-bellied Warbler], formerly considered a separate species but merged on the basis of playback experiments (Robbins et al. 1999), lack of differences in vocalizations (Robbins et al. 1999) and genetics (Vilaça and Santos 2010), and the presence of mixed pairs and intermediates where their ranges overlap (Hellmayr 1935, Willis 1986, Robbins et al. 1999).

  • p. 599. Remove the genus Paroaria and its included species from the family Emberizidae and transfer them to a position at the beginning of the Thraupidae, preceding the heading for the genus Conirostrum. Substitute the following for the Notes under the generic name:

  • Notes.—Mitochondrial genetic data (Yuri and Mindell 2002, Burns and Naoki 2004) provide strong evidence that the affinities of this genus, previously placed in the Emberizidae, are with the Thraupidae.

  • p. 602. Arremon costaricensis and A. atricapillus are separated from A. torquatus. Delete the species account for A. torquatus and replace it with new accounts for A. costaricensis and A. atricapillus as follows:

Arremon costaricensis (Bangs). Costa Rican Brush-Finch.

  • Buarremon costaricensis Bangs, 1907, Auk 24:310. (Boruca, Costa Rica.)

  • Habitat.—Montane Evergreen Forest, Tropical Lowland Evergreen Forest, Secondary Forest, Elfin Forest (300–1,200 m; upper Tropical and Subtropical zones).

  • Distribution.Resident in southwestern Costa Rica (north to the Gulf of Nicoya) and Chiriquí, western Panama.

  • Notes.—Formerly (AOU 1998) included in A. torquatus (Lafresnaye and d'Orbigny) [White-browed Brush-Finch], but here considered specifically distinct on the basis of differences in vocalizations, plumage, and genetics (Cadena and Cuervo 2010). Formerly considered conspecific with A. atricapillus, either as part of A. torquatus (AOU 1998) or distinct from A. torquatus (AOU 1983). Formerly placed in the genus Buarremon (AOU 1998).

Arremon atricapillus (Lawrence). Black-headed Brush-Finch.

  • Buarremon atricapillus Lawrence, 1874, Ann. Lyc. Nat. Hist. New York 10:396. (“Bogotá,” Colombia.)

  • Habitat.—Montane Evergreen Forest, Tropical Lowland Evergreen Forest, Secondary Forest, Elfin Forest (700–1,000 m; upper Tropical and Subtropical zones).

  • Distribution.Resident in eastern Panamá province, eastern San Blas, and eastern Darién, Panama, south to the west slope of the Eastern Andes, both slopes of the Central Andes, and the Pacific slope of the Western Andes, northern Colombia.

  • Notes.—See comments under A. costaricensis.

  • pp. 614–615. Amphispiza belli is transferred to the new genus Artemisiospiza. After the account for Amphispiza bilineata, insert the following heading and Notes:

Genus ARTEMISIOSPIZA Klicka and Banks

  • Artemisiospiza Klicka and Banks, 2011, Zootaxa 2793:67. Type, by original designation, Emberiza belli Cassin.

  • Notes.—Formerly considered part of Amphispiza (AOU 1983, 1998), but genetic data (Klicka and Spellman 2007, DaCosta et al. 2009) indicate that the two genera are not closely related.

  • Change Amphispiza belli (Cassin) to Artemisiospiza belli (Cassin), place the account for this species under the heading and Notes for Artemisiospiza, and insert the following at the end of the existing Notes: Formerly placed in the genus Amphispiza. See comments under Artemisiospiza.

  • p. 650. In the citation for Icterus spurius, change “Catesby, Nat. Hist. Carolina 1:48, pl. 48” to “Catesby, Nat. Hist. Carolina 1:49, pl. 49” to correct a typographical error (Wetherbee 1992).

  • pp. 660–662. The genus Carpodacus as currently constituted does not form a monophyletic group (Arnaiz-Villena et al. 2007, Lerner et al. 2011, Zuccon et al. 2012); the North American species are not closely related to the remaining species of Carpodacus, which include the type species roseus. Insert the following after the species account for Carpodacus erythrinus:

Genus HAEMORHOUS Swainson

  • Haemorhous Swainson, 1837, Nat. Hist. Classif. Bds. 2:295. Type, by subsequent designation (Sharpe, 1888), Fringilla purpurea Gmelin.

  • Notes.—Formerly merged with Carpodacus (AOU 1983, 1998), but now treated as a separate genus on the basis of genetic data (Arnaiz-Villena et al. 2007, Lerner et al. 2011, Zuccon et al. 2012), which show that the two genera are not closely related.

  • Change the generic names of Carpodacus purpureus , Carpodacus cassinii , and Carpodacus mexicanus to Haemorhous ,and move the accounts for these species in this sequence to follow the heading and notes for Haemorhous. Add parentheses around the authority name for cassinii. For cassinii and mexicanus, make the appropriate changes in generic names or abbreviations within the existing Notes, and insert the following at the end of the Notes: Formerly placed in the genus Carpodacus. See comments under Haemorhous.

  • Substitute the following for the Notes in the species account for H. purpureus:

  • Notes.—Formerly placed in the genus Carpodacus. See comments under Haemorhous.

  • Delete the final sentence of the Notes in the species account for Carpodacus erythrinus.

  • Move the citation for Burrica from the synonymy of Carpodacus to the synonymy of Haemorhous.

  • p. 669. Change the English name for Serinus canaria to Island Canary (as in Clements 2000 and Dickinson 2003). Change the Notes to read: Formerly known as Common Canary (e.g., AOU 1998), but name modified to conform to general worldwide usage.

  • p. 669. Recent genetic data have shown that the current linear position of the genus Pyrrhula does not properly reflect its evolutionary relationships (Lerner et al. 2011, Zuccon et al. 2012). Move Genus PYRRHULA Brisson, its citation, and the species account for Pyrrhula pyrrhula to a position following the species account for Pinicola enucleator and insert the following under the heading and citation for Pyrrhula:

  • Notes.—Nuclear and mitochondrial genetic data indicate that Pyrrhula and Pinicola are closely related genera (Lerner et al. 2011, Zuccon et al. 2012).

  • p. 685. Change the English name for Macronectes giganteus to Southern Giant-Petrel (as in Dickinson 2003, Christidis and Boles 2008, Remsen et al. 2012). Add the following to the end of the species account: Formerly (e.g., AOU 1998) known as Antarctic Giant-Petrel, but name modified to conform to general worldwide usage.

  • p. 686. Change the English name for Pterodroma solandri to Providence Petrel (as in Dickinson 2003, Gill and Wright 2006, and Christidis and Boles 2008). Change the last sentence of the species account to: Formerly (e.g., AOU 1998) known as Solander's Petrel, but name modified to conform to general worldwide usage.

  • p. 687. Change the English name for Oceanites gracilis to Elliot's Storm-Petrel (as in Gill and Wright 2006 and Remsen et al. 2012). Add the following to the end of the species account: Formerly (e.g., AOU 1998) known as White-vented Storm-Petrel, but name modified to conform to general worldwide usage.

  • p. 693. Change the English name for Sterna trudeaui to Snowy-crowned Tern (as in Gill and Wright 2006 and Remsen et al. 2012). Add the following to the end of the species account: Formerly (e.g., AOU 1998) known as Trudeau's Tern, but name modified to conform to general worldwide usage.

  • p. 696. Change the English name for Copsychus saularis to Oriental Magpie-Robin (as in Dickinson 2003, Rasmussen and Anderton 2005, and Gill and Wright 2006). Add the following to the end of the species account: Formerly (e.g., AOU 1998) known as Magpie-Robin, but name modified to conform to general worldwide usage.

  • p. 698. Change the English name for Lagonosticta rubricata to African Firefinch (as in Stevenson and Fanshawe 2002, Sinclair and Ryan 2003, and Dickinson 2003). Add the following to the end of the species account: Formerly (e.g., AOU 1998) known as African Fire-Finch, but name modified to conform to general worldwide usage.

  • pp. 705 ff. Make the following changes to the list of French names of North American birds:

Insert the following names in the proper position as indicated by the text of this supplement:

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Move Leucopternis semiplumbeus to follow Pseudastur albicollis. Move species in Buteogallus to follow Cryptoleucopteryx plumbea in this order:

  • Buteogallus anthracinus

  • Buteogallus gundlachii

  • Buteogallus meridionalis

  • Buteogallus urubitinga

  • Buteogallus solitarius

Move FALCONIDAE, PSITTACIDAE, and their included species, to a position following Campephilus imperialis.

Rearrange the generic placements and species sequence in TROCHILIDAE, FURNARIIDAE, and TROGLODYTIDAE as indicated by the text of this supplement.

Transfer Paroaria coronata and P. capitata to the family THRAUPIDAE, to precede Conirostrum leucogenys.

Move Pyrrhula pyrrhula to a position following Pinicola enucleator.

Proposals considered but not accepted by the committee included recognition of Junco bairdii (Baird's Junco) as a species distinct from J. phaeonotus (Yellow-eyed Junco); recognition of the extralimital species Gracula indica (Southern Hill-Myna) as distinct from G. religiosa (Hill Myna); division of Amazona leucocephala (Cuban Parrot) and Passerculus sandwichensis (Savannah Sparrow) into multiple species; transfer of Deltarhynchus flammulatus (Flammulated Flycatcher) to Ramphotrigon; resurrection of the genera Pseudobulweria for Pterodroma rostrata (Tahiti Petrel), Urubitinga for Buteogallus urubitinga (Great Black-Hawk) and B. solitarius (Solitary Eagle), and Heterospizias for Buteogallus meridionalis (Savanna Hawk); modification of the English names of Buteo plagiatus (Gray Hawk), Columbina inca (Inca Dove), Setophaga flavescens (Bahama Warbler), and Pseudonestor xanthophrys (Maui Parrotbill); rearrangement of the linear sequence of species in the genus Spizella; and establishment of a new minimum standard for holotypes of extant avian species.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Normand David serves as the committee's advisor for classical languages in relation to scientific names, and Michel Gosselin is the authority for French names. We thank A. Aleixo, M. J. Braun, M. R. Browning, C. D. Cadena, E. Carey, S. Claramunt, W. S. Clark, P. Escalante, D. D. Gibson, B. Hallett, J. C. Haney, M. Iliff, D. S. Lee, B. A. Millsap, H. Mounce, H. D. Pratt, M. B. Robbins, S. H. Seipke, C. Stahala, and D. C. Wege for assistance, suggestions, and comments.

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©2012 by The American Ornithologists' Union. All rights reserved.
R. Terry Chesser, Richard C. Banks, F. Keith Barker, Carla Cicero, Jon L. Dunn, Andrew W. Kratter, Irby J. Lovette, Pamela C. Rasmussen, J. V. Remsen, James D. Rising, Douglas F. Stotz and Kevin Winker "Fifty-Third Supplement to the American Ornithologists' Union Check-List of North American Birds," The Auk 129(3), (1 July 2012). https://doi.org/10.1525/auk.2012.129.3.573
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