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1 April 2005 NEST TREES OF NORTHERN FLYING SQUIRRELS IN THE SIERRA NEVADA
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Abstract

We examined the nest-tree preferences of northern flying squirrels (Glaucomys sabrinus) in an old-growth, mixed-conifer and red fir (Abies magnifica) forest of the southern Sierra Nevada of California. We tracked 27 individuals to 122 nest trees during 3 summers. Flying squirrels selected nest trees that were larger in diameter and taller than either random trees or large (>50-cm diameter at breast height) nearest-neighbor trees. Snags were used more often than live trees relative to their availability. Nest trees were usually close to riparian habitat; 86% of nest trees were <150 m from a perennial creek. Flying squirrels selected red fir and avoided incense cedar (Calocedrus decurrens). Mean distances between nest trees and size of core-nest areas were greater for males than for females. No detectable relationship was found between size of core-nest area and distance to a perennial creek. These results suggest that flying squirrels of the Sierra Nevada may require large trees and snags within 150 m of perennial creeks for their critical habitat needs.

Marc D. Meyer, Douglas A. Kelt, and Malcolm P. North "NEST TREES OF NORTHERN FLYING SQUIRRELS IN THE SIERRA NEVADA," Journal of Mammalogy 86(2), (1 April 2005). https://doi.org/10.1644/BEH-110.1
Accepted: 1 June 2004; Published: 1 April 2005
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