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1 October 2001 EFFECTS OF SPATIAL AND HOST VARIABLES ON HEMATOZOA IN WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS WINTERING IN BAJA CALIFORNIA
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Abstract

A survey of blood parasites was conducted in February 1995 on white-crowned sparrows (Zonotrichia leucophrys) wintering in two environmentally different localities of Baja California Sur (Mexico). Blood parasite prevalence was higher in La Purísima (49%) than in San José del Cabo (8%), but there were no differences between ages or sexes within each locality. All haematozoan infections were by Haemoproteus coatneyi, except one bird in each site that were positive for Trypanosoma sp. We found no evidence for the predicted negative relationship between host body condition and intensity of parasitism. The relatively high prevalence in one site suggests that an increase of hematozoa transmission may occur in that area.

Blanco, Rodríguez-Estrella, Merino, and Bertellotti: EFFECTS OF SPATIAL AND HOST VARIABLES ON HEMATOZOA IN WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS WINTERING IN BAJA CALIFORNIA
Guillermo Blanco, Ricardo Rodríguez-Estrella, Santiago Merino and Marcelo Bertellotti "EFFECTS OF SPATIAL AND HOST VARIABLES ON HEMATOZOA IN WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS WINTERING IN BAJA CALIFORNIA," Journal of Wildlife Diseases 37(4), (1 October 2001). https://doi.org/10.7589/0090-3558-37.4.786
Received: 7 August 2000; Accepted: ; Published: 1 October 2001
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