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1 September 2002 Element Accumulation Patterns in Foliose and Fruticose Lichens from Rock and Bark Substrates in Arizona
Samuel B. St. Clair, Larry L. St. Clair, Darrell J. Weber, Nolan F. Mangelson, Dennis L. Eggett
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Abstract

Growth form and substrate influences on elemental accumulation patterns were investigated in four lichen species. Two fruticose species (Usnea amblyoclada on rock and Usnea hirta on bark) and two foliose species (Flavoparmelia caperata on rock and Flavopunctelia flaventior on bark) were collected below Massai Point in Chiricahua National Monument in southeastern Arizona, U.S.A. Samples were analyzed for 14 elements. A two-way ANOVA model was used to examine the relationships between substrate and growth form (independent variables) on element accumulation (dependent variable) patterns in lichen samples. In the ANOVA model the growth form variable was significant for K, Ca, Ti, Ba, Fe, Ni Cu, Zn, Pb, Rb, and Sr while the substrate variable was significant for K, Ti, Mn, Fe, Ni, Rb, and Sr. A significant interaction between the two class variables was observed for P, K, Ti, Mn, Fe Ni, Rb, and Sr. Accumulation of sulfur appeared to be independent of both growth form and substrate influences. In this study growth form was a key factor affecting element accumulation patterns in lichens. It is proposed that thallus continuity and orientation, which partially define growth form characteristics, influenced the accumulation of elements from airborne and substrate sources.

Samuel B. St. Clair, Larry L. St. Clair, Darrell J. Weber, Nolan F. Mangelson, and Dennis L. Eggett "Element Accumulation Patterns in Foliose and Fruticose Lichens from Rock and Bark Substrates in Arizona," The Bryologist 105(3), 415-421, (1 September 2002). https://doi.org/10.1639/0007-2745(2002)105[0415:EAPIFA]2.0.CO;2
Received: 20 June 2001; Accepted: 1 March 2002; Published: 1 September 2002
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