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1 December 2014 “Double-Trick” Visual and Chemical Mimicry by the Juvenile Orchid Mantis Hymenopus coronatus used in Predation of the Oriental Honeybee Apis cerana
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Abstract

It has long been hypothesized that the flower-like appearance of the juvenile orchid mantis is used as visual camouflage to capture flower-visiting insects, although it is doubtful whether such morphological resemblance alone could increase their success in hunting. We confirmed that juvenile female orchid mantes often succeed in capturing oriental honeybees, while adult females often fail. Since most of the honeybees approached the juveniles from the front, we hypothesized that juvenile orchid mantes might attract honeybees by emitting some volatile chemical cues. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses revealed that the mantes' mandibular adducts contained 3-hydroxyoctanoic acid (3HOA) and 10-hydroxy-(E)-2-decenoic acid (10HDA), both of which are also features of the pheromone communication of the oriental honeybee. We also successfully detected 3HOA emitted in the head space air only at the time when the juvenile mantes were attempting to capture their prey. Field bioassay showed that the Oriental Honeybee predominantly preferred to visit dummies impregnated with a mixture of the appropriate amounts and ratios of 3HOA and 10HDA. We therefore conclude that the juvenile mantes utilize these as allelochemicals to trick and attract oriental honeybees.

© 2014 Zoological Society of Japan
Takafumi Mizuno, Susumu Yamaguchi, Ichiro Yamamoto, Ryohei Yamaoka, and Toshiharu Akino "“Double-Trick” Visual and Chemical Mimicry by the Juvenile Orchid Mantis Hymenopus coronatus used in Predation of the Oriental Honeybee Apis cerana," Zoological Science 31(12), 795-801, (1 December 2014). https://doi.org/10.2108/zs140126
Received: 10 June 2014; Accepted: 1 August 2014; Published: 1 December 2014
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